Global Education at FDU

Fairleigh Dickinson University opened its doors at the start of World War II with an innovative and ambitious goal: to provide its students with an education "of and for the world." Today, our University considers its founding mission more relevant and urgent than ever before. Our recently reaffirmed mission, simply stated, is to be "a center of academic excellence dedicated to the preparation of world citizens through global education."

A global education is much more than having international campuses or exchange programs. It is also a curriculum that ensures that all of our students will be able to succeed in a world marked by interdependence, diversity and rapid change. A global education is one that provides knowledge and understanding of culture, language, geography and global perspectives. A global education trains students to rapidly access and evaluate a wealth of international information resources. Most importantly, a global education is one that enables students to understand the world through the eyes of others and teaches them how their actions can affect, and be affected by people throughout the world.


Did you know?
Over 80 percent of students said it was very or somewhat important that colleges and universities offer opportunities to interact with students from other countries. Almost three out of four students said that they believe it is important that their college offer courses on international topics. Over 70 percent of respondents said it is important that their college offer study abroad programs. Almost nine in ten students said they were interested in gaining exposure to another culture. Just over 60 percent said they were interested in international education to acquire career-related experiences. (Source: ACE Survey of 500 high school seniors who intended to enroll at four-year colleges or universities in the fall of 2000.)

Did you know?
The American Council on Education (ACE) in their recent report states that 93 percent of the public believe that knowledge of international issues will be important for the careers of their children and other young people. That same percentage said it would be important to understand other cultures and customs to compete successfully in a global economy. Also, ACE reported, approximately 90 percent of high school seniors believe that international skills and competencies would help them work with people from different cultures and provide a competitive edge in the workforce.

Did you know?
An ACE survey, taken one year after September 11, 2001, found that support for academic programs that focus on international issues remained strong. Many people recognize that September 11 proved that knowledge about other regions and cultures is more than nice to have, it's also a matter of national security and survival. The National Association of Foreign Student Advisors (NAFSA) in their report titled "securing America's Future: Global Education in Global Age," emphasized that after September 11, Americans' continued insularity may become a "national liability."