BS in Computer Science

The Bachelor of Science degree program in computer science provides a theoretically based education in computer science, coupled with real-world applications. Students are exposed to a broad range of fundamental concepts in such areas as software engineering, computer organization, database systems, management information systems, and operating systems, as well as to a wide variety of computer applications. The computer science core requirements are supplemented by four highly in-demand concentrations: cybersecurity and information assurance, database management, game and mobile application development and information security administration. Students must complete two of the four concentrations.

The program requires the successful completion of at least 120 credits of course work.

Graduates of the program, many of whom enter the industry, are prepared to function well in most computing environments. They are familiar with a spectrum of fundamental principles and have been encouraged to approach problems with creativity.

Prerequisies: elementary and intermediate algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry and two units of science.

BS in Computer Science with Concentration in Cybersecurity & Information Assurance

Attacks on computer systems of industries, governments, financial organizations, e-commerce, and mobile users continue to increase. The demand for well trained professionals to counter these attacks is also expanding. FDU's Gildart Haase School of Computer Sciences and Engineering, in conjunction with the School of Criminal Justice, Political Science, and International Studies, is offering cybersecurity programs to address this need. The concentration in Cybersecurity and Information Assurance has been developed to train computer science majors in this important field of national and international security.

The National Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) have designated Fairleigh Dickinson University as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education (CAE/CDE) through academic year 2020.

The Cybersecurity and Information Assurance concentration of the BS Computer Science program helps students learn the principles and practices of defending the cyberspace security and integrity. It also teaches the general principles that will help the learners to develop algorithms, systems, and tools for information assurance. The Metropolitan Campus of FDU enjoys the proximity of New York City with its major financial institutions and government agencies. The School enjoys strong relationships with companies in the Northern NJ and New York City that help students to expand their experiential learning opportunities.

Courses in this concentration will cover a range of subjects, from an overview of Computer Security foundations through policies, services and mechanisms underlying systems security. Students will learn the policies related to assurance of data confidentiality, integrity, availability, and traffic control. They will become familiar with service components such as confidentiality, integrity, identification, authentication, authorization, non-repudiation, accounting, access control, and traffic analysis. They will also learn the principal mechanisms of cybersecurity, such as encryption, public key infrastructure, biometric authentication, integrity check values, intrusion detection and protection, and firewall administration.

BS in Computer Science with Concentration in Database Management

The unprecedented growth of generated and deployed data has triggered the overwhelming demand for data managers, predicted to expand further in the coming years. Computer science graduates with strong skills needed to manage, explore, and visualize data and produce forecasts are in high demand on the job market. Furthermore, many database-systems oriented jobs are not subject to offshoring, as the data can be highly sensitive and subject to strict security measures. Therefore, a steady and competent pool of local talent is needed to fill the job ranks.

The Database Management concentration at Fairleigh Dickinson University incorporates three required courses and three elective courses. The three required courses, Introduction to Computer Science (CSCI 2215), Data Structures (CSCI 2232) and Database Systems (CSCI 3268), are already included in the core requirements of the BS Computer Science curriculum.

CSCI 2215 Introduction to Computer Science explains all areas of computer science and lays the groundwork for more advanced courses. CSCI 2232 Data Structures teaches how to use the fundamental data structures, such as stacks, queues, trees, and linked lists, in program design. Understanding the concepts of these data structures provides a basis for an understanding of more complex notions, such as principles of database systems.

The third requirement, CSCI 3268 Database Systems, is an essential class introducing the foundations of database management, e.g. schema design, normalization, entity and referential integrity, and indexing. Students not only learn the syntax of SQL, the language of all relational database management systems (DBMS), but also become proficient in business problem solving. In a course project, students obtain hands-on experience with ORACLE—a widely used DBMS.

In the Database Management concentration, a student must also choose three electives among four possible courses, Advanced Database (CSCI 3331), Distributed Database Systems (CSCI4373), Data Warehouse and Data Mining (CSCI 3460) and Enterprise Computing for the IBM zSeries (CSCI 3470). CSCI 3331 Advanced Database teaches the real-world duties of a database administrator (DBA) and the complete process of a database design, from interviews to implementation. After practicing with a number of sample schemas, students are encouraged to design a database in a team-oriented project.

Additionally, methods for backup, recovery, reorganization, space management, performance and tuning, locking and deadlock are studied, as well as the atomicity, consistency, isolation and durability, known as ACID properties.

CSCI4373 Distributed Database Systems class examines databases in networked environments and addresses the following complex issues: How are updates handled over several sites? How is locking performed when the data rows are at several sites and inconsistency may result? How is a distributed deadlock determined?

CSCI 3460 Data Warehouse and Data Mining provides students with a solid foundation of technologies and techniques relevant to the deployment of the “Big Data.” The case study of Walmart, the world's largest retailer, is used to communicate data warehouse development to course participants. To solidify the foundation, the concepts of data mining are illustrated with other relevant examples ranging from fraud detection to marketing analysis.

CSCI 3470 Enterprise Computing for the IBM zSeries is a pace-changing class for many students. Computing in the IBM mainframe environment is a rare skill, which makes a new graduate highly competitive in a job market. This course introduces a mainframe perspective on computer science and covers DB2— the IBM relational database, enabling students to learn data management for an enterprise environment.

BS in Computer Science with Concentration in Game & Mobile Application Development

Computer-based animation and video gaming systems have engaged many individuals not only as entertainment but also in growing their creative and competitive skills. The state of the art gaming systems, supported by the ever more powerful hardware architectures and software development, have helped create a multi-billion dollars industry which keeps on growing every day. Although the first home console system, Magnavox Odyssey, and the Atari Pong arcade game were released as far back as in 1972, the real success of such gaming systems has been fueled by the advent of cheap high-performance computing platforms, astounding graphics and display systems, internet-based media serving collaborative and competitive purposes, mobile systems for on-the-go usage, and the genius of gaming designers. Developers of such systems need a strong and multifaceted background in computer hardware, software, networking, multi-media, and art.

Games are increasingly fielded as mobile apps. The developers of these mobile applications need a strong working knowledge of the different platforms that applications are suitable for, such as smartphones and tablets. In addition, they need to have a strong foundation in programming in such areas as Java, C++, objective-C, PHP, MySQL, "cloud storage" and Flash.

A career in Game and Mobile App showcases your creativity and software development acumen to impress the world. Job satisfaction and salary levels for Game and Mobile App development professionals are at all-time high levels. FDU's Gildart Haase School of Computer Sciences and Engineering, in cooperation with the School of Art & Media Studies, is offering the concentration in Game and Mobile Application Development to train computer science majors in this exciting field.

The Game and Mobile Application Development concentration of the BS Computer Science program helps students learn the principles and practices of 2D and 3D game development using audio, video, animation and graphics. They will also learn how to develop applications using Android's API and developing games on mobile platforms. The Metropolitan Campus of FDU enjoys the proximity of New York City with its major financial institutions, media industry, and government agencies. The School enjoys strong relationships with companies in the Northern NJ and New York City that helps FDU graduates to expand their experiential learning through internships.

BS in Computer Science with Concentration in Information Security Administration

Securing information and guarding private data have become a critical need and activity for individuals, businesses, industries, and the government. The developments in Big Data and the Internet of Things are revolutionizing the operation of businesses and governments, and improving the quality of life. At the same time, they are exposing the vulnerabilities of our systems and infrastructures to malicious attacks. The demand for well trained professionals to develop the programs and to administer the systems that deter these attacks is also expanding. The concentration in Information Security Administration has been developed to train Computer Science majors in the growing and important field of national and international cybersecurity administration.

The National Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) have designated Fairleigh Dickinson University as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education (CAE/CDE) through the academic year 2020.

The Information Security Administration concentration of the BS Computer Science program helps students learn the principles and practices of administering information assurance and to develop algorithms, systems, and tools for this domain. The Metropolitan Campus enjoys the proximity of New York City with its major financial institutions and government agencies. The School also has strong relationships with companies in the Northern NJ and New York City that help students to expand their experiential learning opportunities.

Courses in this concentration will cover a range of topics, ranging from an overview of Information Security policies, to the provision of programs, services and mechanisms of information assurance. Students will learn the policies related to assurance of data confidentiality, integrity, and availability. They will become familiar with risk assessment and control, and with the business continuity principles. They will be able to securely administer computing, networking, and database systems. Additionally, they will learn the essential mechanisms of information assurance such as encryption, public key infrastructure, intrusion detection and protection, and firewall administration.