Program Learning Outcomes Detail

a400

Affiliated Health Concentration (BSAHT, BSCLS, BSMIS)

Completion of this program will result in a Bachelor of Science in Allied Health Technologies with a concentration in diagnostic medical sonography, nuclear medicine, respiratory care or vascular technology awarded jointly between FDU and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-School of Health Related Professions (UMDNJ-SHRP).

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Apply the scientific method to generate hypotheses, design and conduct experiments and analyze data.

·  Become proficient in communicating biological concepts both verbally and in writing.

·  Complete a clinical training program at a partner institution to prepare for a job in a clinical field.

·  Effectively use critical thinking to draw logical conclusions.

·  Explain and understand the basic concepts of biological sciences across all scales.

·  Locate, comprehend and critically analyze scientific information/technology and how to apply that scientific information.

 


a401

BS, Biology

This curriculum is designed for students who plan to attend graduate school and for pre-professional students who wish to prepare for admission to a school of dentistry, medicine, optometry, osteopathy, pharmacy, podiatry or veterinary medicine.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Explain and understand the basic concepts of biological sciences across all scales.

·  Become proficient in communicating biological concepts both verbally and in writing.

·  Locate, comprehend and critically analyze scientific information/technology and how to apply that scientific information.

·  Apply the scientific method to generate hypotheses, design and conduct experiments and analyze data.

·  Effectively use critical thinking to draw logical conclusions.

 


a402

MS, Biology

To provide an array of graduate offerings designed to expand each student’s biological science knowledge beyond the undergraduate level to a Masters level of understanding; and to prepare students for careers in biological and health related fields as well as doctoral and professional schools.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Gain a Masters level knowledge of major biological science concepts including cell and molecular biology, ecology and environmental science, and anatomy and physiology.

·  Apply the scientific method to generate hypotheses, design and conduct experiments and analyze data.

·  Effectively use critical thinking to draw logical conclusions.

·  Locate, comprehend, and critically analyze scientific information/technology, including how to apply that scientific information.

·  Communicate biological concepts both verbally and in writing.

 

 


a403

Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Science

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate an elementary understanding of pharmaceutical chemistry.

·  Demonstrate an understanding of and an ability to apply core concepts of chemistry and biochemistry to an extent that will allow them to be successful.

·  Employ modern library tools to locate and retrieve scientific information.

·  Interpret experimental data and explain its significance

·  Know and follow proper procedures and regulations for safe handling and use of chemical and laboratory equipment.

·  Use computers in data acquisition and processing and use appropriate software as a tool in data analysis.

·  Write and speak clearly on chemical and biochemical topics.

 


a404

BS, Chemistry and Biochemistry (Concentration: Pre-Pharmacy)

The Bachelor of Science with a major in Biochemistry program is designed for students focused on pre-professional study, preparing them for admission to a school of medicine, veterinary medicine or dentistry with a series of core courses in chemistry and biology. The curriculum offers lecture and laboratory course work in topics that will effectively prepare students for future plans in these areas and will also provide students with extensive preparation for graduate school in chemistry, biochemistry, and molecular biology or career plans within the areas of chemistry, biochemistry or related areas of biotechnology.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Use computers in data acquisition and processing and use appropriate software as a tool in data analysis.

·  Interpret experimental data and explain its significance.

·  Employ modern library tools to locate and retrieve scientific information.

·  Know and follow proper procedures and regulations for safe handling and use of chemical and laboratory equipment.

·  Demonstrate an elementary understanding of pharmaceutical chemistry.

·  Demonstrate an understanding of and an ability to apply core concepts of chemistry and biochemistry to an extent that will allow them to be competitive.

·  Use standard laboratory equipment, modern instrumentation, and classical techniques to carry out experiments.

·  Write and speak clearly on chemical and biochemical topics: Graduates will be able to demonstrate a mastery of the material to others through oral and written communications.

 


a405

MS, Chemistry

MS Chemistry – Thesis & Non-Thesis Options:


The MS Chemistry degree is open to students with an undergraduate degree in chemistry, biochemistry, chemical engineering and related fields. Typically, part-time students working as chemical industry enroll in the non-thesis option while full time student tend to take the thesis option.

Students who opt for the thesis engage in mentored research, write a thesis based on the research in which they have engaged and engage in a thesis defense before a committee of chemistry faculty before the degree is awarded. The master's thesis incorporates all learning outcomes and students cannot graduate without having demonstrated mastery of all outcomes. While non-thesis students do not defend research to a committee they must meet all benchmarks by program design.

 

The number of degree credits required for the thesis option is 32. The non-thesis option requires 34 credits of course work.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Carry out, record and analyze the results of chemical experiments.

·  Communicate the results of their work both orally and through accepted written forms of professional communications.

·  Demonstrate a firm understanding of the foundations in the fundamentals and application of chemical and pharmaceutical principles of drug synthesis, isolation and analysis, and pharmacokinetics and dynamics.

·  Demonstrate skills in problems solving, critical thinking and analytical reasoning.

·  Use modern library searching and retrieval methods to obtain information about a topic related to pharmaceutical chemistry.

·  Use modern instrumentation and classical techniques, to design experiments, and to properly record the results of their experiment.

 


a406

MS, Chemistry (Concentration: Pharmaceutical Chemistry)

The Master of Science in Chemistry with a Concentration in Pharmaceutical Chemistry is intended to serve the needs of the pharmaceutical industry in the northern New Jersey area. With the help of experienced industrial adjunct faculty, the department provides a needed rigorous and flexible course of study in this important area.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Carry out, record and analyze the results of chemical experiments.

·  Communicate the results of their work both orally and through accepted written forms of professional communications.

·  Demonstrate a firm understanding of the foundations in the fundamentals and application of chemical and pharmaceutical principles of drug synthesis, isolation and analysis, and pharmacokinetics and dynamics.

·  Demonstrate skills in problems solving, critical thinking and analytical reasoning.

·  Use modern instrumentation and classical techniques, to design experiments, and to properly record the results of their experiment.

·  Use modern library searching and retrieval methods to obtain information about a topic related to pharmaceutical chemistry.

 


a407

College Writing

Logic and Organization

·  Students will be able to:
1. Apply course material and content to improve thinking and decision making.
2. Create unified and coherent texts.

 

Support/Evidence

·  Students will be able to:
1. Find and use resources for answering questions and solving problems.
2. Analyze and critically evaluate ideas, arguments and points of view.
3. Provide ample, relevant and persuasive support for claims established.

 

Citations/Works Cited

·  Students will be able to apply course material and content to prepare texts that reflect correct and responsible documentation of sources consulted.

 

Control of Language

·  Students will be able to practice and develop clear and effective control of language for expressing ideas.

 


a408

BA, Communication Studies

The mission of the BA in Communication Studies is to prepare students for participation in an increasingly globalized world through a practical, critical, and theoretical understanding of human communication. The Department seeks to cultivate in its students highly developed skills in individual oral and written expression, in critical thinking, in group discussion and problem solving, and in conceptualizing the functions of communication. The BA in Communication Studies is oriented toward helping students understand how communication principles apply to a broad range of contexts, such as mass media, journalism, public relations, advertising, health care providers, political campaigns, cross-cultural exchanges, and social movements. In this way, students graduate with talents and knowledge that may serve them well in whatever personal, community, and professional directions they choose to pursue.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Graduates will be able to demonstrate competency in critical thinking that encompasses dimensions of informal (natural language) logic and ethical analysis

·  Graduates will be able to understand and appreciate multiple cultures and global issues from historical, ethical and moral perspectives

·  Graduates will be able to analyze important current global issues from multiple viewpoints, with an understanding of the inter-connectedness of political, economic, environmental and social systems.

·  Graduates will be able to carry out thorough and effective information search strategies using traditional print, digital, and Internet sources, evaluate information accessed, and use this information along with existing knowledge to create something new.

·  Graduates will be able to prepare and deliver effective oral presentations, incorporating suitable research and using presentation software, in a style appropriate to an educated audience.

·  Graduates will be able to analyze and interpret quantitative information, and apply mathematical methods in solving problems encountered by an educated adult in daily life and within a field of study.

·  Graduates will be able to explain and summarize the scientific world view, explain and apply the scientific method of inquiry, and explain the nature of the scientific enterprise specific to at least one scientific content discipline.

·  Graduates will be able to use technology as a learning and communication tool that enhances productivity and professional practice.

·  Graduates will demonstrate the ability to write documents that present and evaluate information and opinion in a logical and analytic manner, incorporating research and documentation, and using style, grammar, mechanics, and format appropriate to an educated audience.

 


a409

MA, Corporate and Organizational Communication

The Master of Arts in Corporate and Organizational Communication gives students the opportunity to study communication processes as they occur in the corporate and organizational context.

Offered by the Department of Communication Studies of the Becton College of Arts and Sciences, the program offers communication professionals an academically-based curriculum incorporating communication issues, skills and technology as they relate to public relations, marketing, media, professional writing and communication management.

The program emphasizes development of skills in critical thinking, problem solving, oral presentation and writing.

Students enrolled in the MA in Corporate and Organizational Communication will:

Study the nature of communication in the corporate context, and the nature of the corporation in the cultural context. Learn how corporations use communication to create and establish brands, reputations and favorable public relations. Explore strategies used by corporations to communicate with key publics, including consumers, investors, media and employees. Develop and enrich personal strengths in strategic and critical thinking, ethics, writing and speaking.

By balancing the study of theory and practice, the program is excellent preparation for students:

Looking to enhance their careers with knowledge that will apply directly to their working lives, or
Interested in pursuing advanced degrees at the doctoral level in corporate and organizational communications
 

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate competency in critical thinking that encompasses dimensions of informal (natural language) logic and ethical analysis.

·  Understand and appreciate multiple cultures and global issues from historical, ethical and moral perspectives.

·  Analyze important current global issues from multiple viewpoints, with an understanding of the inter-connectedness of political, economic, environmental and social systems.

·  Prepare carry out thorough and effective information search strategies using traditional print, digital, and Internet sources, evaluate information accessed, and use this information along with existing knowledge to create something new.

·  Prepare and deliver effective oral presentations, incorporating suitable research and using presentation software, in a style appropriate to an educated audience.

·  Analyze and interpret quantitative information, and apply mathematical methods in solving problems encountered by an educated adult in daily life and within a field of study.

·  Explain and summarize the scientific world view, explain and apply the scientific method of inquiry, and explain the nature of the scientific enterprise specific to at least one scientific content discipline.

·  Write documents that present and evaluate information and opinion in a logical and analytic manner, incorporating research and documentation, and using style, grammar, mechanics, and format appropriate to an educated audience.

 


a410

BA in Philosophy

The Philosophy major emphasizes rigorous discipline in reasoning: philosophic analysis has traditionally explored the logical structure of beliefs and of theories, unique to philosophy among the Liberal Arts and Sciences.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Detect, identify and evaluate deductive and inductive arguments; assess by the formal standards that apply in each case; detect formal and informal fallacies; evaluate for consistency of claims. (Logical Reasoning)

·  Identify and evaluate normative claims, arguments and theories; learn, critically discuss and master application of reigning theories and methods. (Moral Reasoning)

·  Show deep understanding of the criteria good theories must meet and explain why there is a match between criteria and expectations about theories. (Analysis of Theories)

·  Comprehend and answer penetrating questions about philosophic texts or conceptual and critical claims raised in any text. (Textual Analysis)

·  Identify key concepts, debates, historic developments, problems and solutions as well as critiques, seminal texts, and theories within relevant historical and other contexts in Metaphysics, Epistemology, Logic and Philosophy of Logic, Ethics and Metaethics, Political Philosophy. (Locating in Context)

·  Research a topic in depth on the basis of authoritative sources and produce a sustained piece of formal writing, written with supporting arguments and thorough analysis while also showing proper source documentation. (Research and Writing)

·  Make a sustained and thorough presentation of a position, fully supported by good arguments, regarding a philosophic problem, viewpoint, solution or critique; answer question in analytic, detailed, fully supported fashion; pose probing questions that show grasp of the material; discuss chosen or assigned paper topic. (Oral Presentation)

 


a411

BA, Creative Writing

The Creative Writing Major at Fairleigh Dickinson is a road and a life. It is also among the most progressive and exciting creative writing programs in the country. Unlike most other programs, students at FDU begin taking creative writing courses in their first semester, and they may also have the opportunity to live with other creative writers in the Creative Writing Living/Learning Community.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Craft stories, poems or creative nonfiction pieces in appropriate styles and structures.

·  Understand the basic concepts of literature:

o   Ability to analyze a text

o   Understanding of theoretical and cultural issues in literary analysis

o   Understanding of theory of genre

·  Incorporate criticism from the writing workshop into the process of revision.

 


a412

BA, Humanities

The humanities major offers students a broadly-based liberal arts education and an integrated interdisciplinary experience built around two seminars taken in the junior and senior years, respectively. The other major courses may be chosen from introductory and advanced-level offerings in literature, history, philosophy, the visual and performing arts, and culture courses in modern languages. The seminars offer intensive interdisciplinary study of themes and historical periods.

·  Graduates will be able analyze and assess critical ideas and positions along with the reasons or arguments given for/against them.

·  Graduates will be able to analyze the nature of the texts, artifacts, ideas, and/or discourses of the humanities discipline and of their underlying assumptions.

·  Graduates will be able to conduct research and write papers analyzing primary texts supported by secondary sources that are documented and written in a sophisticated voice.

·  Graduates will be able to explain the basic principles of the humanities, employ discipline specific terms, and describe the conventions particular to the humanities discipline.

·  Graduates will be able to identify and analyze how literary, historical, cultural and/or philosophical events have affected the creation and/or reception of the humanities discipline.

 


a413

BA, Literature

In the 21st century literature is a global art that transcends borders, illuminating human concerns, beliefs, and experiences. Through study of a wide range of literary works from past and present and from throughout the world, literature majors in Becton College develop insights needed to understand the diverse aesthetic, cultural, and historical bases of literature, and enhance their ability to read with critical understanding and write clearly and analytically.

At the completion of this program students will be able to demonstrate:

·  Advanced writing skills, sustained argument, and use of appropriate literary sources.

·  Critical thinking skills applied to literary analysis

·  Relate main point of analysis to literary culture(s) or tradition(s)

·  Relate main point of analysis to social or historical context(s)

 


a414

BA, Spanish Language and Literature (Concentration: World Languages)

The Mission of the Modern Languages Program is to teach students languages, cultures, and literatures as an integral part of a well-rounded liberal arts education. We respond to the demands of the global community by providing students with the language skills, cultural awareness, analytical ability, and appreciation for difference necessary for successful social interactions in our increasingly multicultural societies. A broad variety of courses expose students to different ways of thinking and seeing most often directly linked to linguistic and cultural differences.

BA, Spanish Language and Literature (Concentration: world Languages)

·  Control vocabulary within specific content areas.

·  Gain cultural literacy within specific content areas.

·  Use Oral communication within the level of the course.

·  Use written communication within the level of the course.

 

BA, Spanish Language and Literature Learning Outcomes

·  Understand texts within literary traditions/history and/or offer an overview of literary history.

·  Provide insight on a specific literary genre or genres and the particularities of writing in this genre.

·  Undertake literary analysis where critical thinking and
contextualization inform discussions and papers.

 


a415

MA, Creative Writing and Literature for Educators

The MA in Creative Writing and Literature for Educators is a unique graduate program that combines the most useful elements of an MFA in Creative Writing and an MA in English, if you are a high-school or middle-school teacher. The program has a threefold mission:
(1) To take our students’ creative writing abilities to the next level, whatever their level.4
(2) To train confident, constructive, and versatile teachers of creative writing. (Here, versatile means they can teach at least the four main genres of creative writing: fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and drama.)
(3) To train effective teachers of literature, who can use creative approaches and creative assignments to help their students develop insight into literary texts.
These three aspects of the mission translate into three assessable objectives for the students. Our graduates will have demonstrated:
(1) Basic competence in writing fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and drama, and appropriate improvement based on where they started.
(2) Ability to constructively critique creative work in fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and drama, as shown by their analysis of craft (including self-reflection) and feedback to peers.
(3) Ability to effectively discuss and analyze works of literature in formal and informal ways, drawing on insight gained from the practice of creative writing.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of the elements of literary craft and form in a variety of genres.

·  Demonstrate an ability to analyze individual literary works with clarity and sophistication.

·  Demonstrate sophisticated writing skills in a variety of genres.

 


a416

MFA, Creative Writing

FDU’s low-residency MFA program in Creative Writing is ideal for students who want a more flexible academic schedule. Students attend two 10-day residencies each year, one in August at FDU‘s Florham Campus in Madison, New Jersey, and one in January at the university’s Wroxton campus in Oxfordshire, England. Throughout the remainder of the school year, as they write and revise their creative work, students work one-on-one with their mentors and participate in online workshops. FDU is the only low-residency MFA program that offers the chance to work on an international literary magazine with an illustrious 57-year history, The Literary Review. FDU is one of the few low-residency programs to offer the chance to study abroad. The Wroxton, England residency gives students the opportunity to meet writers, editors, and agents from the U.K., even as they immerse themselves in their writing. In the 17th-century Jacobean mansion, and along the footpaths of the English countryside, and in nearby Oxford and London, students enjoy a creative idyll. Because our class sizes are small (usually 4-6 students), students work in a rigorous and focused way with their mentors. At residencies, faculty and students dine together, attend readings and lectures together, and socialize. Our curriculum helps each writer follow his or her unique creative exploration, with an individually tailored reading list and a guided study of craft. Our teaching philosophy is twofold: 1) one learns to write through the practice of writing; and, 2) to echo Ralph Waldo Emerson, “There is then creative reading as well as creative writing”—in other words, one learns to write through close reading. The MFA degree is offered in five disciplines: Poetry, Fiction, Writing for Young Adults, Creative Nonfiction, and Literary Translation. We offer fellowships and awards to competitive applicants.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Critique creative work using the appropriate terms and vocabulary

·  Read literature as writers, using the skills of close reading

·  Understand and employ basic technical and aesthetic elements

·  Write an expository essay about Craft, using appropriate methods of analysis and substantiation

 


a417

BA, Mathematics (Concentrations: Actuarial Science, Computer Science)

Mathematics is a discipline of great power, beauty, and significance in our global technological society. The Mathematics Program seeks to provide an undergraduate curriculum of quality, balance, and consistency within a liberal arts setting that connects mathematics with its applications in the world. The goal of the program is to prepare students for careers such as secondary education, actuarial science, as well as to prepare them for graduate studies in the mathematical sciences.

The department offers a variety of programs for mathematics majors, service courses for science and business students, and general education courses for liberal arts requirements.

The faculty and staff work in a friendly, supportive environment, and are dedicated to advancing the student's success and accomplishment. We seek to develop skills, appreciation, and understanding in mathematics, and to communicate a sense of the intellectual challenge and excitement of mathematical work.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate an understanding of differentiation and integration techniques and how to use them in problem solving.

·  Demonstrate an understanding of concepts and techniques in discrete mathematics, including logic, induction, recursion, graphs and Boolean algebra.

·  Demonstrate an understanding of linear and Matrix Algebra and how to use them in solving problems which includes:

o   Vector spaces and linear transformations; systems of linear equations, bases, matrix representations of linear transformations, matrix algebra, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, determinants, canonical forms, inner product spaces.

·  Demonstrate an understanding of solving problems using probabilistic models and analyzing data using methods of mathematical statistics.

 


a418

BS, Computer Science (Concentrations: Cybersecurity, Game Development)

The mission of the Computer Science Program at FDU’s Florham Campus is to engage in education, research and service activities required for creating and disseminating the knowledge of Computer Science which has become essential in our global technological society. Through education, we attempt to instill in our students the necessary values and attitudes that prepare them for continued lifelong learning and leadership. This is accomplished by providing an undergraduate curriculum of quality, balance and consistency within the framework of a liberal arts education, which will foster a connection between Computer Science and its application all over the world. The curriculum provides our students with a deep understanding of both fundamentals and important current issues in computer science preparing them for productive employment careers or the chance to pursue advanced degrees. Through research, coupled with student involvement, the department strives to generate new ideas, knowledge and technology.

 

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Analyze, modify and document programs, represent solutions to problems using algorithmic thinking and algorithms.

·  Represent solutions to problems using algorithmic thinking and algorithms.

·  Convert algorithms to programs.

·  Design, implement and test computer solutions to problems

·  Adapt to different computing and programming environments

·  Identify and analyze the structures and mechanisms of a computer system.

·  Evaluate and administer fundamental computer architectures, parallel organizations, Internet based protocols and computer security technologies.

 


a419

MS, Computer Science

The graduate program in computer science prepares students for the direct pursuit of productive careers in industry and for continued graduate study. The program's orientation is toward educating professionals to become leaders in various areas of computer science ranging from software engineering to computer design, and from systems analysis to the management of information systems.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Design, implement, test, and debug programs.

·  Use different programing paradigms such as object oriented programming and procedural programming.

·  Design, implement, and analyze algorithms for solving problems.

·  Build large software systems.

·  Understand and analyze the structures and mechanisms of a computer system.

 

 


a420

BA, Behavioral Neuroscience

The FDU Behavioral Neuroscience Major is designed to advance knowledge of how the nervous system develops, functions, and can be enhanced. The first goal of the major is to identify brain disease processes arising from injury, genetic, and environmental sources. The second goal is to develop ways to protect and enhance the central nervous system. Neuroscience is inherently a multidisciplinary and integrative discipline and requires the interaction of course content and broad laboratory skills development in Chemistry, Biology and Psychology. This approach promotes collaboration for developing problem-solving research strategies in the different levels of neural organization (molecular, cellular, systems/pathways, and behavioral/cognitive). This major provides cross-disciplinary training that provides a solid foundation for postgraduate studies in Neuroscience.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Employ critical skills to design and conduct experiments using modern research methods. This includes exhibiting the necessary bench laboratory skills to collect behavioral data and to master several modern laboratory techniques currently employed in behavioral neuroscience research and discovery.

·  Build techniques to write up results and demonstrate mastery of communication skills necessary to publish findings.

·  Use critical and creative thinking skills by employing, when appropriate, the scientific method to identify and evaluate the literature relevant to Neuroscience.

·  Demonstrate familiarity with integration of theoretical, empirical and historical knowledge base in Biology, Chemistry and Psychology relevant to Neuroscience.

·  Compose and clearly articulate oral summaries and critiques of data collection and relevant publication content.

 


a421

BA, Psychology

The mission of the Department of Psychology and Counseling, Florham Campus, Fairleigh Dickinson University, is to create in its students an awareness and understanding of the complexities that comprise human behavior and mental processes. We provide an education in the field of psychology that covers the major concepts, ideas and practices that explain, through human and animal research, how and why people function as they do. Additionally, students are trained to build on a theoretical basis in order to provide a transition to areas of applied practice. Thus, our mission is to provide students with both theoretical knowledge and its practical application in their professional and personal lives.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Employ their understanding of scientific methodology and conduct research in the field of psychology.

·  Demonstrate communication skills, particularly their ability to write in a scientific manner.

·  Display critical thinking and problem solving skills when appropriate using the scientific method.

·  Employ the major psychological theoretical constructs, historical figures and important research findings to evaluate behavior.

·  Orally express and develop an awareness and understanding of themselves and others through the application of psychological research findings.

 


a422

MA in Clinical Mental Health Counseling

The MA in Clinical Mental Health Counseling prepares its graduates for the professional practice of counseling in a variety of work settings such as universities, community agencies, clinics, hospitals, drug abuse centers, child protective services, private practice, business, and industry. The program also prepares highly competent counseling professionals – including entry-and advanced-level counselors, counseling researchers and counseling administrators- to have a significant impact on the mental health field as counselors, program directors, researchers, grant writers and policy makers on the local, state and national levels. With those goals in mind, the students are trained in a broad spectrum of issues including: assessment, diagnosis, individual, group, and family counseling, consulting, and advocacy skills. In addition, students acquire an understanding of crisis intervention strategies, psychopharmacology, the mental health delivery system, the effective use of data in helping clients make informed choices, and the influence of gender differences, cultural diversity, social problems and age on the emergence of various problems and symptoms.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Apply and demonstrate appropriate counseling and crisis intervention skills with individuals, families, and groups.

·  Conduct intake interviews with mental status assessment and use the DSM-IV to provide a diagnosis of presenting mental health issues.

·  Demonstrate competence in applying theories and models in the conceptualization of client difficulties and the development of treatment plan.

·  Demonstrate competence in gathering, analyzing, interpreting and presenting case materials about their clients in written and oral forms.

·  Demonstrate knowledge about research design and implementation and use research and evaluation results to guide counseling practice.

·  Demonstrate knowledge of and maintain the ethical standards of ACA and the legal standards of the profession.

·  Demonstrate knowledge of and the ability to form effective helping relationships with diverse individuals, families, and groups.

·  Demonstrate knowledge of basic classifications, indications, and contraindications of psychopharmacological medications.

·  Demonstrate knowledge of the pragmatic concerns (e.g., managed care and budget constraints) facing the mental health field today.

·  Exhibit knowledge of group development, dynamics, leadership styles, and counseling methods and skills.

·  Exhibit personal and professional behaviors, skills, and attitudes conducive to effective counseling and professional development.

·  Knowledge of and assume roles and functions consistent with the professional identity of counselors.

·  Students will apply knowledge of research and assessment techniques in their counseling work and in the assessment of programmatic outcomes.

·  Theoretical knowledge of the professional literature that forms the scholarly and practical foundation of counseling and development.

 


a423

MA, Industrial/Organizational Psychology

The Industrial/Organizational Psychology graduate program is designed to provide a comprehensive and empirically based background in Industrial/Organizational Psychology. Students gain knowledge and understanding of a variety of work psychology based concepts ranging from selection and hiring, learning and development, assessment and measurement, employee engagement, and leadership to the impact of technology on behavior and systems. We follow the scientist-practitioner model and include both theory and concept in our coursework as well as applications to the current realities of the work place.

·  Outcome #1: Core Psychological Domains - (A) History and Systems of Psychology, (B) Fields of Psychology

o   Students can articulate the history of psychology and how it developed and evolved into its present configuration. Students can integrate I/O psychology into the broader discipline by tracing I/O’s roots back to major psychological theories and other perspectives that have shaped thinking in I/O psychology.

o   Students can articulate how I/O psychology differs from other fields of psychology such as those that study basic processes (perception, memory, learning); from fields that study particular populations of individuals (children, mentally disturbed, developmentally challenged); from fields that study analytic procedures or assessment procedures (psychometrics); and from fields that study mechanisms of behavior (physiological psychology, brain research). Students can articulate how I/O draws most of its major foundations from social psychology, psychometrics, motivation, learning, and personality

·  Learning Outcome #2: Data Collection and Analysis Skills - (A) Research Methods, (B) Statistical Methods/Data Analysis

o   Students can apply research methods, procedures, and statistical techniques used in I/O psychology. Students can assess and apply the correct statistical technique to differing situations and explain their results to both an academic and a business audience. Students are able to interpret and evaluate others’ research. Students are skilled in using at least one of the major statistical software packages designed for social science research so they can perform appropriate analyses for applied research projects in work organizations.

·  Learning Outcome #3: Core I/O Domains-(A) ethical, Legal, and Professional Contexts,(B)Measurement of Indiv Diff, and many more (see report)

o   Students can articulate the ethical, legal, and professional contexts within which the master’s level I-O practitioner operates. Students can articulate classical measurement theory (e.g., reliability, validity) and apply it when evaluating assessment instruments for use in organizations. Students can articulate the theoretical and practical issues surrounding criteria (standards) such as single versus multiple criteria, criterion dynamics, the characteristics of good and acceptable criteria (relevance, reliability, practicality), and criteria as a basis for understanding human behavior at work and in organizations. Students can develop valid criteria and methods of measuring them. Students can design and develop an appropriate and comprehensive job and task analysis and a competency model for use in an organization

·  Learning Outcome #4: Additional Industrial-Organizational Domains-A) Career Development Theory, (B) Compensation & Benefits, (C)Program Eval

o   Students can articulate career development theories and apply them in organizations to assist both employees and employers in developing their career opportunities.

o   Students can articulate and assist in the design of reward systems to motivate high performance.

o   Students can design and deliver evaluations to assess effectiveness of a wide variety of organizational programs using both quantitative and qualitative methods.

·  Learning Outcome #5: Professional skills - (A) Presentation skills,(B) Writing skills,(C) Interpersonal skills,(D) Computer skills

o   Students can convey their ideas to others in an organized, logical, and interesting manner using both positive non-verbal and verbal behavior as well as facility with computer presentation programs (e.g. Power Point).

o   Students can express their ideas clearly and succinctly in written and oral form.

o   Students can work successfully with others and are aware of their own strengths and limitations

o   Students can use I/O related computer software and hardware appropriately and with ease.


a424

MA, Psychology (Concentration: Organizational Behavior)

The MA in Industrial/Organizational Psychology with a concentration in Organizational Behavior and the Certificate in Organizational Leadership alternative brings to bear a combination of personal development, academic insight and mentored work experiences that will create tomorrow’s vital organizational leadership. The concentration in Organizational Behavior offers a low ­residence option, with classes on alternate Saturdays augmented with internet studies expressly designed for managers and prospective managers who aspire to true leadership – to understand and influence the ways in which people work within their organizations. It offers an exciting alternative to traditional graduate business programs, focusing on the development of the critical interpersonal, leadership and team­building skills needed for success.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

 

·  Demonstrate mastery of transactional and transformational leadership skills.

·  Display knowledge of theories of motivation and influence.

·  Distinguish among various leadership styles and practices.

·  Demonstrate mastery of the leadership literature and research findings.

·  Be capable of constructing leadership development and training activities.

·  Communicate effectively at all levels of an organization.

·  Demonstrate techniques for assessing individual differences.

·  Display knowledge of major personality theories and assessment techniques.

·  Exhibit sound cognitive skills and ability to measure them.

·  Apply the basic concepts of emotional Intelligence to leadership activities.

·  Construct a viable personal career development plan.

·  Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of organizational culture.

·  Construct and interpret job satisfaction and engagement surveys.

·  Develop and implement performance appraisal systems and instruments.

·  Utilize sound strategic planning and crisis management models and procedures.

·  Demonstrate mentoring and coaching skills and techniques.

·  Use current strategies and techniques for managing change.

·  Appreciate and delineate differences in global organizational cultures.

·  Identify varieties of teams and their characteristics.

·  Identify the strategies that create high performance teams.

·  Demonstrate knowledge of decision making techniques and strategies.

·  Use productive conflict management styles and techniques.

·  Create synergistic teams and groups using effective team leadership skills.

·  Create and deliver compelling presentations.

·  Demonstrate clear and concise writing skills.

·  Demonstrate sound Interpersonal and networking skills.

·  Utilize online and print resources to generate applications of latest findings to leadership activities

 


a425

BA, Criminology

Criminology is the study of the root causes of crime and deviant behavior in society. Early criminologists believed that crime was a choice based on an individual's free will, but the field expanded to include biological, psychological and sociological explanations of crime. Poverty, family structure, and capitalism are among some of the widely debated root causes of crime. Criminologists consider what motivates offenders as well as the impact of crime on victims and society as a whole. By studying the causes of crime, criminologists can offer practical solutions to reduce or even prevent certain types of crime. Criminologists have been instrumental in evaluating criminal justice policies such as Megan's Laws, mandatory sentencing for drug offenders and Three Strikes laws.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Apply basic research methods in criminology

·  Apply major crime policies

·  Explain major criminological paradigms and theories

·  Explain the fundamentals of criminal justice system

 


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BA, History

History is the study of the human past from a wide variety of methodological perspectives and is an ongoing process of learning and discovery. Investigating history requires students to search out, critically analyze and lucidly present information in order to make sense of complex situations. These are the skills that decision-making in government, law, business, journalism and other fields requires.

The major is designed to provide students with a nuanced understanding of the past in a wide variety of geographical and chronological settings, and to equip them with the tools and skills necessary to become effective critical thinkers, researchers and writers. History majors interested in a career in teaching may also be admitted to QUEST, the five-year accelerated preparation program for teaching certification.

BA, History Learning outcomes:

 

·  Basic Knowledge: a certain mastery of raw facts relating to the subject matter.

·  Appreciation for Historiography: ability to explain how and why historians tell different stories about the past.

·  Interpretation of Primary Sources: ability to interpret primary sources in a sophisticated manner.

·  Written English: reasonable command of written English; ability to write papers that are largely free of grammatical and mechanical errors, and that exhibit appropriate style.

·  Critical Thinking: argument formation and support; formulation of clear thesis, supported by evidence.

 


a427

BA, Political Science (Concentrations: Campaigns and Elections, International Relations)

The ancient Greeks thought of politics as the “authoritative” or highest form of study – since political decisions govern and shape our economy, the military, our social interactions, even what happens in our family life. At FDU’s Florham Campus, we take the importance of political science seriously, not just as a way of studying governments, national values, and contemporary political problems, but in using ideas to improve our political and civic life.

Our majors explore the ideologies, institutions, and policies of governments. These include government at the local, state, and national level, as well as foreign governments and international relations. Our studies include legislatures and election systems, regulatory agencies and courts; police departments and armed forces, criminals and terrorists, the media and voters, presidents and prime ministers. We also study ideas: who ought to get what? What does it mean to live well? Which of our institutions and political arrangements are working well and which are dysfunctional and sick?

Finally, we explore political change over time and space and ask what leads to revolutions and what emerges from them? Why (and how) do some countries become and stay democratic – while other do not? Why do some ethnic groups come into conflict and violence while others do not?

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Analyze and explain the historical roots of American political institutions, rules and norms.

·  Apply theoretical perspectives to foreign and international political arrangements, including, but not limited to, rational choice, realist and liberal theories.

·  Apply these areas of knowledge to analyze and predict the current, past and future behavior of states and state-level institutions.

·  Demonstrate an understanding of the ethical and theoretical background of qualitative and quantitative political analysis.

·  Demonstrate an understanding of the modern and historical structure of international politics, the international political system, international organizations, rules and norms.

·  Demonstrate an understanding of the various claims of validity made by empirical studies in political science, both popular and academic.

·  Explain how various states resolve collective action and representation problems, as well as the benefits and problems resulting from these institutional arrangements.

·  Deconstruct existing studies to determine the validity of claims made by these studies, as well as be able to design their own studies to maximize validity claims.

·  Demonstrate an understanding of recent and current American political events and be able to explain and analyze these events through the use of historical precedent and theoretical approaches.

·  Demonstrate an understanding, and be able to apply, theoretical approaches and criticisms of the American political system, both modern and historical.

 


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BA, Sociology

When claims are made that the family is disintegrating, that America is a middle class society, that blacks are making economic progress, that women have come a long way, that the mass media provide audiences with what they want to see and hear, do you know how to evaluate these arguments? Sociology students learn how to assess such statements. They learn not only the facts of social life, but also the methods for analyzing various claims about society.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Apply the scientific method to generate hypotheses, design and conduct experiments and analyze data.

·  Expand cross-cultural knowledge and emphasize the interconnectedness of the local and the global forces.

·  Expand knowledge on social life, social institutions, social inequality, identity, and social change.

·  Familiarize themselves with sociological perspectives and concepts.

·  Develop their critical and analytical skills.

·  Develop their oral presentation skills.

 

 


a429

BA, Animation (Concentrations: Video Game Animation)

Digital animators create the visual magic in movies, games and television. If you want to become a 3D animator, video game artist or special effects artist, Fairleigh Dickinson University can help you turn your digital arts interest into a successful profession. Our exceptional animation curriculum is focused on learning the latest industry standard tools, techniques and theory behind the creation of the 3D animations, motion graphics and digital art used in today’s entertainment industries.

Students interested in these disciplines learn the foundations necessary to produce high quality 3D digital artwork and animations in our Animation and Video Game Animation programs. Course work emphasizes the visual design component as well as the software necessary to create sophisticated computer artwork and animations. Our experienced faculty teaches software skills and artistic aesthetics, spanning 3D modeling up to the most complex character animation techniques, while focusing on creating practical projects which are commonly produced in today's professional digital media companies. Students complete their creative work using such software as 3D Studio Max, ZBrush, Unity and After Effects which culminates in a senior project which premieres at a local movie theater prior to graduation.

Our students gain real world experience by completing industry internships for a variety of clients such as MTV, ABC,
Nickelodeon, Blue Sky Studios, Dreamworks and NBC Universal at CNBC among others. Many of our students have gone on to employment in these companies after graduation as well as other companies such as Sony Pictures Imageworks in Vancouver and Telltale Games in California.

Our faculty members are working professionals in 3D computer animation, motion graphics, special effects, game design/animation, web design/development and graphic design, bringing a wealth of real world experience and knowledge to share with our students. At Fairleigh Dickinson University we foster a creative, hands-on environment where classes blend the foundations of artistic skill and animation with emerging technologies.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

 

·  Utilize the concepts of animation language as it is used in the professional industry.

·  Sketch their story ideas in storyboard format.

·  Put 3D models and graphics into motion

·  Present their environment, character and object designs into sketch form.

·  Present animation concepts, principles, and practices in oral form.

·  Effectively write character biographies, project proposals, treatments, stories, storylines and scripts.

·  Create high-detailed 3D models as they relate to the film, broadcast and video industries.

·  Apply knowledge of the animation industry as it relates to film, broadcast and video.

 


a430

BA, Film (Concentrations: Film Directing, Post Production, Cinematography)

At FDU Film, we approach teaching film from both the artistic and professional point of view. Because our program is adapted to better reflect the reality of the industry, we enjoy a higher percentage of FDU Film graduates who find professional work within a year after graduation. We have also created three new concentrations to help our students better prepare and educate themselves in specific skills needed to pursue a career in the competitive marketplace of the real world. So now, along with our standard Film Major which concentrates on Production, students may also choose from concentrations in Directing, Cinematography and Editing.

FDU Film students work with the most up-to-date professional industry equipment, from HD digital cameras and industry standard lighting and grip equipment to Avid and Final Cut editing software, as well as AfterEffects and Entertainment Partners production software. Our intimate classes and low student to faculty ratio program gets students shooting films their freshmen year. Courses in Screenwriting, Directing, Lighting and Cinematography complement our Production and Post-Production courses. Our program culminates in an exciting event – the screening of our FDU Film student senior thesis films at a public movie theater.

 

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Integrate historical and cultural knowledge with film production.

·  Utilize the concepts of film language in their professional life.

·  Apply knowledge of business and industry practices to the development of works in television and film media.

·  Present film concepts, principles, and practices in oral form.

·  Apply effective screenwriting techniques and formatting skills.

·  Perform the technical skills required in film production and post-production environments.

 


a431

BA, Fine Arts (Concentrations: Studio Arts)

The Studio Art Major offers a program of study for students interested in careers in the Fine Arts and related fields, such as Art Education, Art Therapy and Museum Studies.

Dedicated and exhibiting Artist/Professors teach a wide range of beginning through advanced level Studio Art classes. Our innovative approach to the Studio Arts matches courses across disciplines: from the unique “Art of the Graphic Novel” and “Ceramic Character Sculpture” to the traditional Life Drawing and Life Sculpture.

The program offers many opportunities for learning beyond the classroom including:
• Annual Student Fine Art Exhibitions
• Class trips to NYC museums, galleries and artist studios each semester
• Creative internships and Career Workshops
• Internationally recognized Visiting Artists (recently Nari Ward, Rina Peleg, Howard Cruse)
• Faculty guided experiential learning /exhibition opportunities
• Student/Faculty Research projects with academic credit
• Regular contact with art alum keeps former students connected to our current students and activities, receptions and trips
• Support for alum exhibitions at FDU and external venues


The Fine Art Studios in Florham Park are located on the picturesque Frederick Law Olmstead (designer of NYC’s Central Park) grounds providing backdrop and subject for art students and classes.

We provide a strong foundation program where each student is individually encouraged to develop their own artistic voice in an interdisciplinary approach. Knowledge of traditional skills is emphasized along with contemporary art and ideas. Offerings include a wide range of classes at multiple levels in Drawing, Painting, Ceramics, Sculpture, Photography, Two- and Three-Dimensional Design, Color Theory, Printmaking, Computer Graphics, and Art History. Students from across the FDU community may explore their own creativity in studio classes while fulfilling university requirements for graduation.

Completion of the major in Studio Arts requires 48 credits. A Studio Art minor requires 18 credits. Classes average 15 to 20 students per class, with some of the advanced classes having smaller enrollments, allowing for the optimum learning experience. Independent Studies, Internships and Research Assistantships are available for additional advanced level study.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Express ideas and concepts utilizing professional Fine Art language.

·  Perform the Studio Art skills required in the production of visual arts.

·  Utilize the concepts of visual language, research and development as applied to Studio Arts.

·  Express visual art concepts, principles and practices in oral form.

·  Apply knowledge of professional Studio Art practices in the creation and exhibition of artworks.

·  Integrate historical and cultural knowledge from Art History with Studio Art practice.

 


a432

BA, Graphic Design (Concentrations: Print Design, Web Design)

The Fairleigh Dickinson University Graphic Design Program believes in the whole designer as an artist, publisher, writer, and typographic expert, who should not only practice their craft, but also have a strong business acumen for the career that is set out before them. We offer two areas of concentration; Print Design and Web Design. Our Print Design program focuses on designing materials such as books, magazines, posters, packaging, and a variety of other media. There is a strong emphasis on a creative approach to problem solving. Students in the Web Design concentration learn to blend technical skill with design expertise, making them ready for a variety of areas in the web design industry. We offer courses in Children's Book Illustration, Wordpress, Social Media Design, Illustration, Project Based Web Design and Electronic Prepress. No matter which concentration is chosen, both instill the creative, technological and philosophical skills needed to be competitive in today's market. Creativity and concept are key in the FDU Design Programs.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate their growth in perceptual acuity, conception understanding and technical facility through their projects and presentations to their peers, faculty, and outside designers and/or clients.

·  Demonstrate competency with various print, web, interactive, illustrative and time-based graphic software programs in designing visual messages in projects and presentations.

·  Demonstrate presentation skills of their work orally, describe the rationale in written form, and contribute to critiques and constructive discussions, enlivened by the weekly critique sessions in classes.

·  Demonstrate their ability to correctly interpret client design needs, identify an appropriate and effective solution and explain why a design solution is appropriate for a market demographic through class critiques and presentations to students, faculty and real world clients they design projects for.

·  Demonstrate their ability to display excellence and independence in thinking, valuing, and acting in class critiques and in their Thesis Capstone course.

·  Demonstrate their knowledge of how to produce products through different output processes and delivery methods, including how to properly prepare files for each media outlet, even as the technology and deliverables change with the times.

·  Demonstrate their knowledge of the history, styles, achievements, issues, processes and directions of their discipline and how these have impacted the present, through exams, projects, research papers and oral presentations.

·  Demonstrate their knowledge with the elements and principals of visual organization as expressed through projects and presentations utilizing conceptual ideas, creativity, traditional media, and graphic software.

 


a433

BA, Theater Arts (Concentrations: Acting, Design & Technical Theater, Musical Theater, Directing)

From Broadway to the Bard, this degree program features practical learning experiences, international theatre studies and the opportunity to both study with a highly credentialed faculty and be mentored by accomplished theatre professionals. Freshmen Theatre Arts Majors will study Basic Acting, Voice, Stagecraft and the History of Theatre on the campus at Madison, NJ. During the student's second semester of Sophomore year or first semester of Junior year, they will spend a semester at FDU’s overseas campus in England. Wroxton College is located just outside Stratford-on-Avon, the birthplace of William Shakespeare and the home of the Royal Shakespeare Company.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Master basic skills of acting using specific and well established principles.

·  Study auditions techniques and been introduced to and critiqued by professionals.

·  Be in control of their physical body and move and dance with grace and ease.

·  Display knowledge of pre-production including carpentry, design, stage management, lighting and sound.

·  Comprehend knowledge of American and European History.

·  Master skills of voice, speech and diction so as to be heard clearly in all venues.

 

 


a434

University Core

·  Critical Thinking: An FDU graduate will demonstrate competency in critical thinking that encompasses dimensions of informal (natural language) logic and ethical analysis.

·  Global Understanding:  An FDU graduate will demonstrate the ability to analyze important current global issues from multiple viewpoints, with an understanding of the inter-­-connectedness of political, economic, environmental and social systems.

·  Cross-cultural understanding:  An FDU graduate will demonstrate the ability to understand and appreciate multiple cultures and global issues from historical, ethical and moral perspectives.

 


a435

BAIS Vancouver

The mission of Petrocelli College of Continuing Studies is to provide access to high quality educational programs to meet the educational needs of adult learners and traditional age students with educational needs not addressed through FDU’s standard admission option. With a commitment to rigorous standards, the college’s programs are designed to be easily accessible, flexible, and responsive to the personal, professional and educational needs of university students of all ages.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate the ability to write documents that present and evaluate information and opinion in a logical and analytic manner, incorporating research and documentation, and using style, grammar, mechanics, and format appropriate to an educated audience.

·  Prepare and deliver effective oral presentations, incorporating suitable research and using presentation software, in a style appropriate to an educated audience.

·  Apply learning to one’s career and life, requiring the capability to define problems; to use information resources such as libraries and computers; and to analyze and integrate knowledge, perspectives and techniques.

·  Demonstrate the ability to carry out thorough and effective information search strategies using traditional print, digital, and Internet sources, evaluate information accessed, and use this information along with existing knowledge to create something new.

·  Demonstrate the ability to analyze important current global issues from multiple viewpoints, with an understanding of the inter-connectedness of political, economic, environmental and social systems.

·  Demonstrate the ability to understand and appreciate multiple cultures and global issues from historical, ethical and moral perspectives.

·  Demonstrate the mastery of a body of knowledge in one subject area or a group of related areas that will be considered the graduate’s specialization.

 


a436

BS, Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management and BAIS Specialization in Hospitality Management

Our mission is to deliver exceptional quality in curricula, to produce world-class graduates who possess integrity and wisdom in preparation for leadership careers among diverse organizations in the international hospitality and tourism industry.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate competency in matters of global significance including global economics and the environment as they relate to the hospitality industry.

·  Demonstrate the ability to conduct effective information search strategies utilizing the internet and other research engines and subsequently examine, assess and integrate the information into formulating an analysis for a case study and/or term project.

·  Demonstrate the ability to develop, implement, coordinate and/or manage a strategic plan through a collaborative process.

·  Demonstrate the ability to effectively use technology tools to assess, manage, support, evaluate, justify and communicate information.

·  Demonstrate the ability to interpret and apply mathematical methods including but not limited to statistical analysis, managerial accounting and finance to solve business related issues.

·  Demonstrate the ability to lead and manage organizational change in the workplace by applying leadership techniques including motivating, embracing diversity, and mutual problem-solving, team-building and communication to ensure that the organization’s vision and mission are achieved.

·  Demonstrate the ability to prepare and deliver effective oral presentations and/or write documents that present and evaluate information and opinions in a logical and analytical manner, incorporate research and documentation, and use style, grammar, mechanics and format appropriate to an educated audience.

·  Demonstrate the ability to successfully analyze, create and act upon information, arguments, and opinions which demonstrate the structural and rhetorical principles of logic.

·  Interact effectively within multi-cultural organizations and will exhibit an appreciation for the dynamics of cultural identity and differences essential for leading in a diverse workplace.

 


a437

Hospitality Management Studies-M.S.

The mission of Petrocelli College of Continuing Studies is to provide access to high quality educational programs to meet the educational needs of adult learners and traditional age students with educational needs not addressed through FDU’s standard admission option. With a commitment to rigorous standards, the college’s programs are designed to be easily accessible, flexible, and responsive to the personal, professional and educational needs of university students of all ages.

The International School of Hospitality and Tourism Management (ISHTM) is dedicated to utilizing all of the industry and educational opportunities the hospitality area has to offer, in preparing our students to assume key positions of responsibility in the hospitality and tourism industries.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate competency in matters of global significance including global economics and the environment as they relate to the hospitality industry.

·  Demonstrate the ability to interpret and apply mathematical methods including but not limited to statistical analysis, managerial accounting and finance to solve business related issues.

·  Demonstrate the ability to lead and manage organizational change in the workplace by applying leadership techniques including motivating, embracing diversity, and mutual problem-solving, team-building and communication to ensure that the organization’s vision and mission are achieved.

·  Interact effectively within multi-cultural organizations and will exhibit an appreciation for the dynamics of cultural identity and differences essential for leading in a diverse workplace.

 


a438

Service Innovation and Leadership-M.S. Multidisciplinary Programs

Master of Science in Service Innovation and Leadership (MSSIL) Program that will be housed in the International School of Hospitality and Tourism Management (ISHTM) provides masters level studies for traditional and non-traditional students in preparation for or advancement in the hospitality management field with a unique focus on service innovation and leadership. The focus is on the core areas of leadership, service strategies, financial systems, human resource administration, organizational communication and conflict management and marketing as they pertain to service innovation and leadership.

Our mission is to develop and nurture students' individual strengths resulting in global services professionals prepared to lead diverse organizations in the domestic and international service sector.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate the ability to evaluate and critique scholarly articles, apply qualitative and quantitative research methodology and conduct effective information search strategies utilizing the Web and other research engines and subsequently examine, assess and integrate the information into analyzing case studies and in the formulation of a special project.

·  Demonstrate the ability to lead and manage organizational change in the workplace by applying leadership techniques including motivating, embracing diversity, and mutual problem-solving, team-building and communication to ensure that the organization’s vision and mission are achieved.

·  Demonstrate the ability to successfully analyze, create and act upon information, arguments, and opinions which demonstrate the structural and rhetorical principles of logic.

·  Demonstrate the ability to write documents that present and evaluate information and opinion in a logical and analytical manner, incorporating research and documentation, and using style, grammar, mechanics and format appropriate to an educated audience.

 


a439

BA in Interdisciplinary Studies (NOT THE SAME as BAIS under Administrative Science)

The Bachelor of Arts in interdisciplinary studies is designed to fundamentally change the way students are taught and the way they learn by shifting the emphasis from the traditional, discipline-based approach to a more comprehensive, integrative approach to the understanding of real-world problems, topics and issues.

The B.A. in interdisciplinary studies will prepare students with the skills, attitudes and flexibility of mind needed to be competitive in a global marketplace. Such students - indeed all students - can expect to live in a dynamic world where a series of career changes over a lifetime is most probable and where change and the unknown are inevitable. In such a world, proficiency in a number of related disciplines becomes a survival tool.

Program Objectives
It is apparent that creativity is enhanced by knowledge of related disciplines and that new insights are gained by applying the methods of one discipline to that of another. The purpose of this program is to provide today's students and tomorrow's citizens with the academic tools and interdisciplinary perspective that will allow them to prosper in such an environment.

The goals of this new B.A. program in interdisciplinary studies will be achieved by a combination of an interdisciplinary approach to the liberal arts and general education, which substitute for distribution requirements; specialization provided by pre-designed programs, in fields such as sports administration, individualized concentrations, or two or more concentrations in established disciplines; and close mentoring relationships between faculty and students. The curriculum draws upon the historic strengths of the faculty of Petrocelli College in scholarship, academic flexibility and innovative teaching techniques and on the wealth of knowledge and experience of the faculties of University College: Arts Sciences Professional Studies and the Samuel J. Silberman College of Business Administration. To summarize, the special features of this program include:
•individualized and pre-designed interdisciplinary concentrations
•a combination of disciplinary concentrations
•faculty mentoring
•all courses taught as interdisciplinary seminars
•the capstone experience.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Develop specialized knowledge in fields of their choice by taking minors or the equivalent of a major in the other colleges of FDU, or design their own field of study with the help of a faculty mentor.

·  Demonstrate the ability to use specialized concepts, perspectives, findings, examples, and theories in an interdisciplinary capstone project.

·  Demonstrate a deep understanding of global and cross-culture topics and perspectives by completing at least five required IDS courses that focus on global and cross-cultural topics.

·  Demonstrate the ability to write clearly, grammatically, and use relevant sources.

·  Demonstrate the ability to clearly state a thesis.

·  Present an integrated argument.

·  Recognize and discuss complex issues, differing perspectives, and opinions.

·  Investigate how individual and social technological choices are interrelated with societal change, human population growth, and human impacts on the environment.

 


a440

Public Administration MPA

The Public Administration Institute seeks to provide well-trained recruits for public and nonprofit agencies, and to improve the skills and credentials of administrators already employed in these organizations.
The mission of the MPA program is to educate graduate level students in the areas of public administration, particularly in the public and non-profit sectors in healthcare administration, and the areas of international relations & diplomacy.

·  Written Communication: Demonstrates recognition and appreciation of the importance effective communication abilities in public administration. Communicates concepts clearly, precisely and professionally.

·  Ethics: Demonstrates an understanding and appreciation of the implications of the ethical dimensions of public administration. Identifies the critical social and environmental effect of ethical decisions. Proposes ethical solutions to various administrative issues. Conveys an appreciation of the consequences of ethical decisions and actions.

·  International Understanding: Demonstrates an understanding and appreciation of the aspects and implications of public administration in an international context. Demonstration a full perspective of and respect for the international community and its issues. Relates an understanding of diverse systems of administration. Evaluates the societal and environmental effect of the same.

·  Management: Demonstrates an understanding of the issue of management in public administration and in the public arena and its relationship to both governmental and cultural issues. Demonstrates an understanding and appreciation of the effect and implication of management on the same. Demonstrates an ability to be a competent, qualified, ethical manager in public administrative roles.

·  Critical Thinking: analyzes issues of public administration. Applies and implements such to actual scenarios and situations. Reviews, analyzes, and integrates facts and data and effective application of the same.

 


a441

Bachelor of Arts in Individualized Studies (BAIS) (includes terminal AA program)

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Individualized Studies program offers adult learners a means to complete their bachelors’ degrees by combining traditional course work with a variety of alternative options for completing degree requirements, including college level subject testing and assessment of experiential learning. All graduates will have acquired a solid foundation in the arts and sciences as well as the knowledge and skills that enable them to be successful in the workplace and in the global community and continue their academic pursuits in a graduate degree program if desired.

The Associate in Arts (AA) in Liberal Arts program provides a foundation of knowledge in the arts and sciences, basic communication and critical thinking skills, and exposure to global issues. The degree program prepares students to be productive in their personal and professional lives, to be informed citizens of the world community, and for further academic pursuit in a baccalaureate degree program. The bilingual delivery option has an additional program goal of English proficiency and the Latino Promise option has an additional program goal of developing fundamental leadership skills.

The BAIS and AA programs are open to both traditional and nontraditional aged students including students whose first language may or may not be English as follows:

Latino Promise (AA) - Traditional age Latino students, English speaking, may be bilingual

Cheng Gong (AA) - Traditional age Chinese students, bilingual

MiraeRo (AA & BAIS) - Korean Adult learners, bilingual

Puerta al Futuro (BAIS) - Latino Adult learners, bilingual

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate the ability to effectively communication in oral and written from using technology as a tool to enhance presentations when appropriate.

·  Demonstrate competency in critical thinking that encompasses dimensions of information (natural language) logic and ethical analysis.

·  Understand basic mathematical tools and principles.

·  Demonstrate knowledge of fundamental leadership skills that can be applied in personal and professional situations.

·  Demonstrate proficiency in the English language skills.

 


a442

Master of Administrative Science (MAS)

The MAS Program aims to meet the educational and career development needs of those working in management and professional positions in public and non-profit sectors by integrating the teaching of theory and practice, by providing an educational experience that prepares students for senior level management and leadership positions while enhancing personal growth and development.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate competency in critical thinking that encompasses dimensions of informal logic and ethical analysis.

·  Demonstrate the ability to carry out thorough and effective information search strategies using traditional print, digital, and internet sources, evaluate information accessed, and use this information along with existing knowledge to create something new.

·  Demonstrate the ability to develop, implement, coordinate, and/or manage a strategic plan through a collaborative process.

·  Demonstrate the ability to prepare and deliver effective oral presentations and or write documents that present and evaluate information and opinion in a logical and analytical manner, incorporating research and documentation, and using style, grammar, mechanics, and format appropriate to an educated audience.

 


a443

Master of Arts in Student Services Administration (MASSA)

The MASSA program focus is on practical and theoretical aspects of the various components relative to the administration and management of college student personnel services, including: student affairs; financial aid and admissions; residence life; intercollegiate athletics; student activities; special populations support; veterans support; disability support; student judicial affairs; campus security; records and registration; and other student services. Leadership and service are core components throughout the program.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate the ability to carry out thorough and effective information search strategies using traditional print, digital, and internet sources, evaluate information accessed, and use this information along with existing knowledge to create something new.

·  Demonstrate competency in critical thinking that encompasses dimensions of informal logic and ethical analysis.

·  Demonstrate the ability to develop, implement, coordinate, and/or manage a strategic plan through a collaborative process.

·  Demonstrate the ability to prepare and deliver effective oral presentations and or write documents that present and evaluate information and opinion in a logical and analytical manner, incorporating research and documentation, and using style, grammar, mechanics, and format appropriate to an educated audience.

 


a444

Master of Science in Homeland Security (MSHS)

The MSHS Program aims to meet the educational and career development needs of those working in management and professional positions in public and non-profit sectors by integrating the teaching of theory and practice, by providing an educational experience that prepares students for senior level management and leadership positions while enhancing personal growth and development.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate competency in critical thinking that encompasses dimensions of informal logic and ethical analysis.

·  Demonstrate the ability to carry out thorough and effective information search strategies using traditional print, digital, and internet sources, evaluate information accessed, and use this information along with existing knowledge to create something new.

·  Demonstrate the ability to develop, implement, coordinate, and/or manage a strategic plan through a collaborative process.

·  Demonstrate the ability to prepare and deliver effective oral presentations and or write documents that present and evaluate information and opinion in a logical and analytical manner, incorporating research and documentation, and using style, grammar, mechanics, and format appropriate to an educated audience.

 


a445

Master of Sports Administration (MSA)

The MSA Program aims to meet the educational and career development needs of those working in management and professional positions in public and non-profit sectors by integrating the teaching of theory and practice, by providing an educational experience that prepares students for senior level management and leadership positions while enhancing personal growth and development.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate the ability to prepare and deliver effective oral presentations and or write documents that present and evaluate information and opinion in a logical and analytical manner, incorporating research and documentation, and using style, grammar, mechanics, and format appropriate to an educated audience.

·  Demonstrate the ability to develop, implement, coordinate, and/or manage a strategic plan through a collaborative process.

·  Demonstrate the ability to carry out thorough and effective information search strategies using traditional print, digital, and internet sources, evaluate information accessed, and use this information along with existing knowledge to create something new.

·  Demonstrate competency in critical thinking that encompasses dimensions of informal logic and ethical analysis.

 


a446

BS Programs (all assessed together as Business Undergraduate Programs)

The mission of the Silberman College of Business at Fairleigh Dickinson University is to be a center of learning committed to the education of tomorrow’s leaders today, to prepare our students to succeed in a global environment and to advance the understanding of business.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Communicate effectively and to make appropriate professional presentations to various organizational stakeholders.

·  Demonstrate knowledge of the global business environment and its influence on business decisions and operations

·  Identify, understand and defend the importance of resolving ethical dilemmas in business situations

·  Read and understand the information conveyed in financial statements and how it can be used in project and business valuation.

·  Utilize appropriate quantitative and/or qualitative tools, information and data to make business decisions that are consistent with the firm’s goals and competitive strategy.

·  Utilize information technology and technology-based productivity research tools to enhance their business decision-making.

 


a447

MS in Accounting

The mission of the Silberman College of Business at Fairleigh Dickinson University is to be a center of learning committed to the education of tomorrow’s leaders today, to prepare our students to succeed in a global environment and to advance the understanding of business.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Analyze accounting problems for a multinational business enterprise. Graduates will be able construct and select solutions to these problems.

·  Analyze, and propose effective solutions to, ethical problems in the accounting profession and in multinational business enterprise.

·  Evaluate the impact of financial, regulatory, and global developments on accounting standards and the accounting profession.

·  Evaluate the importance of quality accounting information and assess the threats to accounting information reliability and relevance.

·  Integrate technology in the accounting function

·  Produce effective collaboration, leadership, negotiation and communication skills needed for effective resolution of multinational business accounting problems.

 


a448

MS in Taxation

The mission of the Silberman College of Business at Fairleigh Dickinson University is to be a center of learning committed to the education of tomorrow’s leaders today, to prepare our students to succeed in a global environment and to advance the understanding of business.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Analyze and propose effective solutions to ethical problems in tax practice

·  Analyze tax issues for individuals and various domestic or international business entities. Having studied the conceptual and analytical framework, including real life applications, graduates will be able to propose solutions to tax problems.

·  Evaluate and analyze tax legislation, statutes, court cases, regulations and IRS pronouncements. Graduates will be able to judge tax policy issues.

·  Perform research in professional tax data bases. Graduates will be able to produce reports detailing the result of their research in a clear, concise and effective manner.

·  Produce effective collaboration, leadership, negotiation and communication skills needed for effective tax practice.

 


a449

MBA for Executives (MBA-E)

The mission of the Silberman College of Business at Fairleigh Dickinson University is to be a center of learning committed to the education of tomorrow’s leaders today, to prepare our students to succeed in a global environment and to advance the understanding of business.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Make ethical strategic business decisions that utilize appropriate quantitative and/or qualitative analyses, information, and data to further the attainment of the firm’s goals and competitive strategies.

·  Purposefully engage one another in collaborative interaction and move successfully toward achieving a shared goal.

·  Understand the ethical responsibilities of business executives in business conduct and can identify ethical missteps in business conduct.

·  Guide and influence individuals and teams to create and develop sustainable organizations.

·  Lead in a global, multicultural business environment.

·  Appropriately weigh social and environmental impacts on all stakeholders when making strategic business decisions to further the sustainable attainment of the firm’s goals and competitive strategies.

·  Understand the information conveyed in financial statements and can use and critically evaluate this information in valuing businesses and projects and can make managerial decisions to correct firm performance.

 


a450

MBA Management for Executives in General Management

The mission of the Silberman College of Business at Fairleigh Dickinson University is to be a center of learning committed to the education of tomorrow’s leaders today, to prepare our students to succeed in a global environment and to advance the understanding of business

 

 


a451

MBA Programs (except for MBA-E)

The mission of the Silberman College of Business at Fairleigh Dickinson University is to be a center of learning committed to the education of tomorrow’s leaders today, to prepare our students to succeed in a global environment and to advance the understanding of business.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Function in a global, multicultural business environment.

·  Communicate effectively, make appropriate professional presentations and understand the role that communication plays in the business environment, internally and externally.

·  Guide and influence individuals and teams to create and develop sustainable organizations.

·  Read and understand information conveyed in financial statements and can use that information in to evaluate the business and value businesses and projects.

·  Inspect, evaluate and integrate information technology (and technology-based information sources) to handle business situations and problems.

·  Make ethical business decisions that utilize appropriate quantitative and/or qualitative analyses, information and data to further the attainment of the firm’s goals and competitive strategies.

·  Understand the ethical implications of business decisions on society and the environment.

 


a452

B.A.Math. (Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics)

The educational objectives of the B.A. or B.S. in mathematics program define the skills, knowledge and attributes that will be needed and achieved by the graduates for a successful career and professional accomplishments three to four years after graduation. The program will produce graduates who:
1. Have an appropriate combination of theoretical knowledge and practical skills in mathematics to enter into and advance professionally in mathematics and related fields.
2. Have a well-rounded education with a strong liberal arts foundation that encourages and supports meaningful dialogue with individuals from other disciplines.
3. Are able to adapt to and succeed in a dynamic global environment.
4. Can engage effectively in oral, written and graphical communications in both interpersonal and public settings.
5. Are prepared to participate in lifelong learning opportunities.
6. Are prepared to continue formal education and obtain advanced degrees in mathematics or related fields.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate a solid foundation in the basic mathematical skills.

·  Apply mathematics to modeling and solving a broad spectrum of problems and issues.

·  Communicate technical material coherently in written reports.

·  Develop independently mathematical ideas and concepts.

·  Present orally technical material persuasively using appropriate presentation tools.

·  Reason deductively in mathematical arguments and discern patterns where they exist.

·  Use modern technology to investigate and analyze mathematical problems.

·  Work effectively in teams with individuals from different cultural backgrounds.

 


a453

B.S.C.S. (Bachelor of Science in Computer Science)

The Bachelor of Science degree program in computer science provides a theoretically based education in computer science, coupled with practical objectives. Students are exposed to a broad range of fundamental concepts in such areas as software engineering, computer organization, database systems, management information systems and operating systems, as well as to a wide variety of computer applications. The core curriculum of required courses can be supplemented by a concentration of courses in a specialized area. The program requires the successful completion of at least 128 credits of course work.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution.

·  Analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society.

·  Apply design and development principles in the construction of software systems of varying complexity.

·  Apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the discipline.

·  Apply mathematical foundations, algorithmic principles, and computer science theory in the modeling and design of computer-bas

·  Communicate effectively with a range of audiences.

·  Design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs.

·  Function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal.

·  Use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice.

·  Understand professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities.

 


a454

B.S.Civ.E.T (Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering Technology)

The Bachelor of Science (B.S) in Civil Engineering Technology curriculum at Fairleigh Dickinson offers a 50/50 combination of theoretical and laboratory course work. It emphasizes the application of mathematics, science and engineering principles to implementation, development and improvement of current technology. The program is most suitable for students who prefer applications and hands-on laboratory experience to theory.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Conduct standard tests and measurements; to conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments; and to apply experimental results to improve processes

·  Design systems, components, or processes for broadly-defined engineering technology problems appropriate to program educational objectives

·  Function effectively as a member or leader on a technical team

·  Identify, analyze, and solve broadly-defined engineering technology problems

·  Select and apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to engineering technology problems that require the application of principles and applied procedures or methodologies

·  Select and apply the knowledge, techniques, skills, and modern tools of the discipline to broadly-defined engineering technology activities

 


a455

B.S.Con.E.T (Bachelor of Science in Construction Engineering Technology)

The Bachelor of Science in Construction Engineering Technology program educates and trains students in the areas of building construction including construction project design, development and management. The curriculum offers a 50/50 combination of theoretical and laboratory coursework and it emphasizes applications of mathematics, science and engineering principles to implementation, development and improvement of current technology. The program is most suitable for students who prefer applications and hands-on laboratory experience over theory.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate a knowledge of the impact of engineering technology solutions in a societal and global context.

·  Apply written, oral, and graphical communication in both technical and non-technical environments; and an ability to identify and use appropriate technical literature.

·  Conduct standard tests and measurements; to conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments; and to apply experimental results to improve processes.

·  Design systems, components, or processes for broadly-defined engineering technology problems appropriate to program educational objectives.

·  Function effectively as a member or leader on a technical team.

·  Identify, analyze, and solve broadly-defined engineering technology problems.

·  Select and apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to engineering technology problems that require the application of principles and applied procedures or methodologies.

·  Select and apply the knowledge, techniques, skills, and modern tools of the discipline to broadly-defined engineering technology activities.

·  Understand and address professional and ethical responsibilities including a respect for diversity.

·  Understand the need for and an ability to engage in self-directed continuing professional development.

 


a456

B.S.E.E. (Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering)

The Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering degree curriculum prepares graduates for entrance into the profession of electrical engineering by providing them a varied and balanced educational experience with an appropriate combination of theoretical and practical skills. Students are provided with a strong foundation in mathematics, basic sciences, computer and design skills, the engineering sciences and the liberal arts. A stimulating course of study is maintained by offering students a reasonable variety of required contemporary courses and electives courses in emerging technical areas. The engineering laboratory experience is fully integrated with course work.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Understand professional and ethical responsibility.

·  Demonstrate a knowledge of contemporary issues.

·  Demonstrate a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.

·  Apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering.

·  Communicate effectively.

·  Design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.

·  Design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.

·  Function on multi-disciplinary teams.

·  Identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.

·  Use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

·  Understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.

 


a457

B.S.E.E.T (Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering Technology)

The Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering Technology program provides the students with the knowledge, skills and necessary training for designing and building electrical and electronic devices, systems and processes. Electrical engineering technologists find employment in such areas as computer systems and networks, electronics, telecommunications, power generation and distribution, controls, instrumentation and automation. Activities include design, liaison, installation, maintenance, services and sales.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.

·  Demonstrate a knowledge of the impact of engineering technology solutions in a societal and global context.

·  Apply written, oral, and graphical communication in both technical and non-technical environments; and an ability to identify and use appropriate technical literature.

·  Conduct standard tests and measurements; to conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments; and to apply experimental results to improve processes.

·  Design systems, components, or processes for broadly-defined engineering technology problems appropriate to program educational objectives.

·  Function effectively as a member or leader on a technical team.

·  Identify, analyze, and solve broadly-defined engineering technology problems.

·  Select and apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to engineering technology problems that require the application of principles and applied procedures or methodologies.

·  Select and apply the knowledge, techniques, skills, and modern tools of the discipline to broadly-defined engineering technology activities.

·  Understand and address professional and ethical responsibilities including a respect for diversity.

·  Understand the need for and an ability to engage in self-directed continuing professional development.

 


a458

B.S.I.T. (Bachelor of Science in Information Technology)

The program emphasizes the practical application of information technology. It provides students with both the breadth and depth of information technology needed for professional success in this field. The IT core courses provide students with integrated, technical knowledge and training in various areas of information technology. Students learn about multimedia technology, the Internet, web site design, computer-based systems, computer networks, data communications, network security, disaster recovery, databases, application development, programming, management and economics. They also study the influence of information technology on the economy, politics, culture and the global society. The mathematics, science and programming courses provide students with a strong analytical and scientific foundation. The students receive a well-rounded education and a strong foundation for thoughtful global citizenship from the liberal arts courses. The development of strong oral and written communication skills is emphasized throughout the curriculum. The program also allows students sufficient flexibility to concentrate in Web Development Technology and/or Network and System Administration and to undertake another concentration or a second discipline of interest (a minor).

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution.

·  Analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society

·  Apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the discipline.

·  Assist in the creation of an effective project plan.

·  Communicate effectively with a range of audiences.

·  Design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs.

·  Effectively integrate IT-based solutions into the user environment.

·  Function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal.

·  Identify and analyze user needs and take them into account in the selection, creation, evaluation and administration of computer-based systems.

·  Recognize the need for and engage in continuing professional development.

·  Understand best practices and standards and their application.

·  Understand professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities.

·  Use and apply current technical concepts and practices in the core information technologies.

·  Use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice.

 


a459

B.S.Math. (Bachelor of Science in Mathematics)

The educational objectives of the B.A. or B.S. in mathematics program define the skills, knowledge and attributes that will be needed and achieved by the graduates for a successful career and professional accomplishments three to four years after graduation.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate a solid foundation in the basic skill sets expected of all undergraduate mathematics majors, including differentiation, integration, solutions of linear differential equations, matrix operations, limits, probability and statistics.

·  Apply mathematics to modeling and solving a broad spectrum of complex problems and issues.

·  Communicate technical material coherently and persuasively in written reports.

·  Develop independently mathematical ideas and concepts.

·  Present orally technical material coherently and persuasively using appropriate presentation software tools.

·  Reason deductively in mathematical arguments and to discern patterns where they exist.

·  Use modern technology, including the computer, software packages, and graphing calculators, to help investigate and analyze mathematical problems.

·  Work effectively in teams.

 

 


a460

B.S.Mech.E.T (Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Technology)

The Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Technology curriculum at Fairleigh Dickinson offers a 50/50 combination of theoretical and laboratory coursework. The program is most suitable for students who prefer applications and hands-on laboratory experience over theory. The degree is offered through the Gildart Haase School of Computer Sciences and Engineering, located within University College: Arts • Sciences • Professional Studies at the Metropolitan Campus. Students who have a strong inclination towards math, sciences and technology, who simply like to tinker, or who are curious to know how things work typically do well in engineering technology. Positive attitudes, willingness to work hard, self-discipline, perseverance, and high motivation play a major role in the students' academic success as well as in their engineering technology career.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.

·  Demonstrate knowledge of the impact of engineering technology solutions in a societal and global context.

·  Apply written, oral, and graphical communication in both technical and non-technical environments; and an ability to identify and use appropriate technical literature.

·  Conduct standard tests and measurements; to conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments; and to apply experimental results to improve processes.

·  Design systems, components, or processes for broadly-defined engineering technology problems appropriate to program educational objectives.

·  Function effectively as a member or leader on a technical team.

·  Identify, analyze, and solve broadly-defined engineering technology problems.

·  Select and apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to engineering technology problems that require the application of principles and applied procedures or methodologies.

·  Select and apply the knowledge, techniques, skills, and modern tools of the discipline to broadly-defined engineering technology activities.

·  Understand and address professional and ethical responsibilities including a respect for diversity.

·  Understand the need for and an ability to engage in self-directed continuing professional development.

 


a461

M.S. in Management Information Systems

The graduate program in Management Information Systems is designed for present and future managers and developers of organizational information systems. Relying on computers and telecommunications networks, these systems are a source of operational efficiency, managerial effectiveness and corporate strategic advantage. The program combines learning how to use and develop information system technology with instruction in business, management and organizations.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Gain and apply the knowledge of Management Information Systems theory and practice to analyze organizational information systems and to develop creative solutions in order to derive value from information.

·  Work effectively in teams and communicate with diverse audiences.

·  Understand the computing-related ethical and societal issues in their impact on individuals, organizations, and communities.

 

 


a462

M.S.C.E. (Master of Science in Computer Engineering)

Fairleigh Dickinson University's new Master of Science in Computer Engineering is designed to train and educate students to work as computer engineers who understand the design trade-off and the interdependency between hardware and software in computers, computer-based systems, computer communications and computer networks. Computer-based systems are widely used in data acquisition, signal processing and conditioning, instrumentation, communications, control, automation and manufacturing. The curriculum provides students with design skills, theoretical concepts and a solid foundation in both hardware and software design in an integrated manner, as well as competency in advanced computer technology. The program emphasizes practical applications of computer engineering.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Use numerical analysis techniques, computer-aided analysis and design methods, and modern engineering tools.

·  Formulate and analyze complex engineering problems, assess trade-offs, and solve problems.

·  Apply advanced knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.

 

 


a463

M.S.C.S. (Master of Science in Computer Science)

The graduate program in computer science prepares students for the direct pursuit of productive careers in industry and for continued graduate study. The program's orientation is toward educating professionals to become leaders in various areas of computer science ranging from software engineering to computer design, and from systems analysis to the management of information systems.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Develop professionally and innovate with the deployment of computing technology.

·  Gain and apply the knowledge of Computer Science theory to analyze problems, assess the trade-offs, and develop creative solutions.

·  Work effectively in teams and communicate with diverse audiences.

·  Understand the computing-related ethical and societal issues in their impact on individuals, organizations, and communities.

 

 


a464

M.S.E.E. (Master of Science in Electrical Engineering)

 

Graduates of the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering program will demonstrate the following attributes and achievements upon or before graduation:
 

o   An ability to apply advanced knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.

o   An ability to formulate, analyze and solve complex engineering problems in a specialized area, such as digital signal processing and communications, computers, or devices and systems.

o   An ability to use numerical analysis techniques, computer aided analysis and design methods, and modern engineering tools.

 


a465

M.S.E-Commerce (Master of Science in E-Commerce)

The goal of the program is to provide graduate education that imparts a coherent body of managerial and technological knowledge centering on e-commerce. Graduates will acquire the educational background necessary to become performing e-commerce professionals, as well as obtain a solid foundation for lifelong learning necessary in a field that is certain to evolve very rapidly.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Gain and apply the knowledge of Electronic Commerce theory and practice to analyze e-commerce businesses, assess the trade-offs, and develop innovative e-commerce systems and businesses.

·  Work effectively in teams and communicate with diverse audiences.

·  Understand the computing-related ethical and societal issues in their impact on individuals, organizations, and communities.

 


a466

Metro Writing Studio

One of the top academic priorities of the Metropolitan Campus of Fairleigh Dickinson University is to graduate students who are competent and confident writers. To advance this goal, the Campus Writing Initiative, an innovative, comprehensive, campus-wide commitment to student writing, was adopted. The Metro Writing Studio supports the Campus Writing Initiative and reinforces the philosophy of the Writing Program. The Studio is staffed with professional tutors who provide students with assistance in all steps of the writing process. Because our aim is to produce better writers-- not just better writing-- our tutors work closely with students to help them acquire for themselves the writing skills they need not only in their classes but in their future careers as well. Accordingly, tutors do not provide editing or proofreading services; rather, they help students learn how to express themselves clearly and coherently in any writing situation they may encounter. In addition, the Studio offers a range of workshops designed not only for students but also for faculty, staff, and the community.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate proficiency in idea development

·  Demonstrate proficiency in integration of textual evidence

·  Demonstrate proficiency in organization

 


a467

Master of Arts in Mathematical Foundations

Fairleigh Dickinson University’s graduate program in Mathematical Foundations is for educators who do not have a math background.
PROGRAM BENEFITS
• The curriculum is aligned with the Common Core State Standards in K-8 Mathematics
• You will get the training to prepare to become a “Highly Qualified” mathematics teacher.
• The training will help you to develop a better understanding of mathematics and how to actively engage students so that they understand math concepts, learn skills and solve problems.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate competence professionalism by addressing the diversity of the student population, including ELL students and students with disabilities.

·  Demonstrate caring professionalism.

·  Demonstrate competence in pedagogy.

·  Continuously assess students and use student data to differentiate instruction based upon student needs.

·  Demonstrate a culturally responsiveness to the needs of diverse learners.

·  Develop and deliver instruction that incorporates the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics.

·  Implement research-based best practices in effective instruction to increase mathematics achievement of all students.

·  Integrate technology into the mathematics curriculum

·  Prepare to obtain their instructional middle school mathematics certification from the New Jersey Department of Education.

·  Qualify to teach elementary, middle school, and special education mathematics.

·  Reflect on and embrace the concept of lifelong learning.

·  Demonstrate technological proficiency.

 


a468

Master of Arts in Science

The following 33-credit curriculum prepares students with either a non-science or science background to become a "highly qualified" elementary, middle school or special education teacher.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Implement research-based best practices in effective instruction to increase science achievement of all students.

·  Address the diversity of the student population, including ELL students and students with disabilities.

·  Develop and deliver instruction that incorporates the NJ Core Curriculum Content Standards in Science and Next Generation Science Standards.

·  Continuously assess students and use student data to differentiate instruction based upon student needs.

·  Assume the role of teacher leader within the educational community.

 


a469

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Education for Certified Teachers

The Master of Arts in education for certified teachers (MACT) is a 36-credit program that allows teachers to pursue specializations while attaining their master’s degrees. Each program is unique in that teachers can graduate with an 18-credit certification in their area of specialization and a 12-credit New Jersey Supervisor license.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Develops and deliver instruction that incorporates the Common Core State Standards and professional standards in their field.

·  Address the diversity of the student population, including ELL students and students with disabilities.

·  Implement research-based best practices in effective instruction to increase achievement of all students.

·  Develop as a teacher leader within the educational community.

·  Continuously assess students and use student data to differentiate instruction based upon student needs.

·  Integrate technology into his/her curriculum to increase student achievement and motivation.

 


a470

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Educational Leadership

The Master of Arts (M.A.) in Educational Leadership requires a total of 36 credits. Students in the program will engage in a multi-year sequence of courses and field experiences that will emphasize the following areas:
1. The development of human relations skills to optimize the Educational Leadership graduate student's ability to interact with teachers, colleagues, parents, students and other members of the school community;
2. Knowledge of effective strategies that promote higher student achievement;
3. Development of skills and knowledge for creating a vision for effective schools and engaging the learning community stakeholders in the process of creating and implementing an educational vision;
4. Assumption of the role of a leader in promoting systemic growth and utilizing available resources;
5. Development of management skills required to effectively utilize available resources; and
6. Engagement of the community and profession in the advocacy of public policy that promotes the success for all students in the learning community.

·  Objective 1: Assume the role of a leader in promoting achievement for all students;

·  Objective 2: Have the management skills required to utilize available district resources;

·  Objective 3: Have the skills and knowledge to create a vision for effective schools and engage the learning community stakeholders in the process of creating and implementing an educational vision;

·  Objective 4: Posses the human relations skills to effectively interact with teachers, parents, students, and members of the school and learning community;

 

·  Program Outcome 1: Qualified to serve as educational leaders;

·  Program Outcome 2: Competent in decision making;

·  Program Outcome 3: Caring educational leaders;

·  Program Outcome 4: Technologically proficient;

·  Program Outcome 5: Culturally responsive to the diverse needs of the learning community in which they work;

·  Program Outcome 6: Reflective of what they have learned and what they need to learn;

·  Program Outcome 7: Prepared to become certified as administrators;

 


a471

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Learning Disabilities

The Fairleigh Dickinson University, Teacher of Students with Disabilities Programs, (Certification and Master of Arts) are designed for previously licensed, highly qualified teachers. Individuals admitted to the programs are interested in obtaining the New Jersey Teacher of Students with Disabilities endorsement and/or a Master of Arts degree with a Teacher of Students with Disabilities specialization.

The mission of these programs is to provide candidates with the specialized knowledge and skill needed for safe and effective practice that is responsive to the individualized academic, behavioral, social, communication, sensory, physical, and health needs of students with disabilities. Specifically, candidates will be prepared with the knowledge and skills relevant to learners and the learning environment, curricular knowledge, assessment, specialized pedagogical skills, and professional and collaborative skills. These areas of focus are consistent with the Council for Exceptional Children’s initial preparation standards for entry-level special educators.

·  CEC Standard 1: Learner Development and Individual Differences: Candidates will be knowledgeable about the learning characteristics of students with disabilities and will be prepared to use this information o plan and provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for these students.

·  CEC Standard 2: Learning Environment; CAEP Cross-Cutting Theme: Diversity: Candidates will be prepared to create safe, inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments, so that students with disabilities become active and effective learners and develop emotional well-being and positive social interactions.

·  CEC Standard 3: Curricular Content; CEC Standard 5: Instructional Planning and Strategies; CAEP Cross-Cutting Theme: Technology: Candidate will be prepared to use knowledge of general and specialized curricula and evidence-based instructional practices, including the use of assistive and instructional technology, to individualize and advance the learning of students with disabilities.

·  CEC Standard 4: Assessment; CAEP Cross-Cutting Theme: Diversity: Candidate will be prepared to multiple, non-biased methods of assessment and data sources to make educational decisions.

·  CEC Standard 5: Professional Learning and Ethical Practice: Candidates will be prepared to use foundational knowledge of the special education field and relevant Ethical Principles and Practices to inform special education practice, to engage in lifelong learning, and to advance the profession.

·  CEC Standard 6: Collaboration: Candidates will be prepared to collaborate with families, other educators, related service providers, individuals with disabilities, and personnel from community agencies, in culturally responsive ways, to address the needs of individuals with disabilities across a range of learning experiences.

 

 


a472

Master of Arts in Teaching

The Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) is a graduate program in teacher preparation for individuals who have a baccalaureate degree in the liberal arts or sciences and a desire to enter the teaching profession. This program is designed to build upon a sound undergraduate academic foundation, as well as the student’s other educational and work-related experiences, to provide an efficient path to state teacher licensure. The program is rigorous in its curriculum and expectations, yet flexible in its scheduling to meet the needs of the graduate student who typically must balance formal coursework with other demands.

·  Educational Objective 1- Implement research-based best practices in effective instruction to increase achievement of all students;

·  Educational Objective 2 - Be competent professionals who can address the diversity of the student population, including ELL students and students with disabilities;

·  Educational Objective 3- Demonstrate the InTASC standards in performance, essential knowledge, and disposition;     

·  Educational Objective 4 - Develop and deliver instruction that incorporates the Common Core State Standards, NJ Core Curriculum Content Standards, and subject specific standards;

·  Educational Objectives 5 - Continuously assess students and use student data to differentiate instruction based upon student needs;

·  Educational Objectives 6 - Assume the role of teacher leader within the educational community.

 

·  Program Goal 1 - Qualified to teach subject matter.

·  Program Goal 2 - Competent in pedagogy.

·  Program Goal 3 - Caring professional.

·  Program Goal 4 - Technologically proficient.

·  Program Goal 5 - Culturally responsive to the needs of diverse learners.

·  Program Goal 6 - Reflective practitioners who embrace the concept of lifelong learning.

·  Program Goal 7 - Prepared to move from undergraduate courses in education into the MAT graduate level courses in education.

·  Program Goal 8 - Prepared to obtain their instructional certification from the New Jersey Department of Education.

 


a473

Masters in Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language (TESL/TEFL)

The Masters in Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language (TESL/TEFL) program is especially designed for teachers of English as a foreign language and for certified teachers of World Languages, English or ESL who desire to expand their knowledge of methodology and incorporate the latest research findings in their teaching, to study in depth how languages, in particular American English, are influenced by the culture and vice-versa, to develop the ability of predicting basic beliefs and behaviors through linguistic analysis of major documents, to master the knowledge and skills needed to integrate technology in language teaching.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Recognize and design instruction that is appropriate for the linguistic and cultural needs of students (TEAC claims of Competent and Culturally-Responsive Educators; FDU Objectives of 1. Written Communication, 2. Oral Communication, 6. Cultural Understanding; TESOL Standards for ESL/EFL Teachers of Adults, Standards 1: Planning, 2: Instructing, 4: Identity and Context, 5: Language Proficiency, 7: Content)

·  Continuously assess students and use student data to differentiate instruction according to language development level of individual student (TEAC claims of Competent and Technologically-Proficient Educators; FDU Objectives of 4. Quantitative Literacy, 6. Cultural Understanding; TESOL Standards for ESL/EFL Teachers of Adults Standards 3: Assessing, 6: Learning)

·  Demonstrate the InTASC standards in performance, essential knowledge, and disposition (TEAC claim of Qualified Educators; FDU Objectives of 1. Written Communication, 2. Oral Communication, 3. Information Literacy, 6. Cultural Understanding; TESOL Standards for ESL/EFL Teachers of Adults Standards 2: Instructing, 5: Language Proficiency).

·  Develop and deliver instruction that is based on formal content standards appropriate to the teaching context (TEAC claim of Competent Educators; FDU objectives of 1. Written Communication, 2. Oral Communication, 3. Information Literacy; TESOL Standards for ESL/EFL Teachers of Adults Standards 1: Planning, 2: Instructing, 7: Content)

·  Develop personal and professional qualities consistent with leadership positions in multicultural settings both globally and locally (TEAC claims of Reflective Practitioner-Educators; FDU Objectives of 5. Global Understanding, 6. Cultural Understanding; TESOL Standards for ESL/EFL Teachers of Adults Standards 4: Identity and Context, 8: Commitment and Professionalism)

·  Implement research-based best practices in effective instruction to increase language achievement of all students (TEAC claim of Competent Educators; FDU objectives of 1. Written Communication, 2. Oral Communication, 3. Information Literacy; TESOL Standards for ESL/EFL Teachers of Adults Standard 2: Instructing)

 


a474

QUEST Undergraduate Teaching

The QUEST Program has received widespread recognition for its five-year combined degree design. This unique program provides students the opportunity to pursue professional studies for teacher preparation leading to state teacher licensure while earning a bachelor's degree in a liberal arts or science major and a Master's of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) degree.

·  Outcome 1: Qualified to teach subject matter.

·  Outcome 2: - Competent in pedagogy

·  Outcome 3: Caring professional

·  Outcome 4: Technologically proficient

·  Outcome 5: Culturally responsive to the needs of diverse learners.

·  Outcome 6: Reflective practitioners who embrace the concept of lifelong learning.

·  Outcome 7: Prepared to move from undergraduate courses in education into the MAT graduate level courses in education.

·  Outcome 8: Prepared to obtain their instructional certification from the New Jersey Department of Education.

 

·  Educational Objective 1: Demonstrate the InTASC standards in performance, essential knowledge, and disposition.

·  Educational Objective 2: Develop and deliver instruction that incorporates the Common Core Standards, the NJ Core Curriculum Standards, and subject specific National Standards.

·  Educational Objective 3: Implement research-based best practices in effective planning and instruction to increase achievement of all students.

·  Educational Objective 4: Develop competency in addressing the diversity of the student population, including ELL students and students with disabilities

·  Educational Objective 5: Integrate technology into lessons where content drives the use of technology in order to provide access to materials, increase student motivation and participation, differentiate instruction, and improve problem-solving skills and higher order thinking.

·  Educational Objective 6: Use multiple forms of continuous assessment to assess their students, collect data, and use the data to differentiate and inform instruction based upon student needs.

 


a475

Programs in Language, Culture, and Professional Advancement (PLCPA)

The Programs in Language, Culture, and Professional Advancement (PLCPA) unit embraces the university mission of preparing global citizens. It is dedicated to imparting the necessary knowledge and skills for international students to achieve English proficiency for academic as well as professional success in their field of studies. Through the programs offered, students will develop cross-cultural competency as well; a skill essential for them to manage and navigate through the complexity of our increasingly globalized world.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Analyze the prompt content and assignment focus of past year placement as well as post-tests.

·  Determine how the evolving academic support/tutoring requirements can be further refined.

·  Determine how to improve the exam layout.

·  Study the trend in performance of international students coming to FDU based on their English proficiency.

 

 


a476

B.A. in Communication

The Communications Program offers a wide range of media-centered courses designed to equip students with the oral, written and technical skills required for careers in such fields as advertising, public relations, print and broadcast journalism, video/media production and writing for both the screen and television. Through the internship program, communication majors gain firsthand experience in their fields. Internships are available in all areas of communication, including print journalism, broadcast journalism, cable and network television, talent representation, advertising and public relations.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Analyze the ethical and legal issues in communications and in the media professions.

·  Effectively communicate with others, with emphasis on the professional world, through written, oral, and multimedia channels.

·  Identify the nature and function of social interactions in interpersonal, group, intercultural, and international contexts.

·  Independently evaluate the effects of media on society and the professions.

·  Skillfully conduct research in the area of media (media history, theory, and profession)

·  Survey the development, current state, and emerging trends of media and their relation to civilization.

 


a477

BA in Art and BA in Fine Art

The Art major is designed to teach students traditional art methods and aesthetics as well as to offer a wide range of computer art courses for the digital media industry. The program combines fine arts, design and technology to balance high career aspirations and prepare students for fields as diverse as print making, desktop publishing, web design, digital photography and video.

Fine Arts division of the School of Art and Media Studies has revised its mission statement as follows:
The Bachelor of Arts in Fine Art program seeks to identify the rich creative and intellectual potential of students to prepare them for lifework in the visual arts, as well as for professional careers in a wide range of creative sectors. Students will develop studio art skills (including drawing, painting, ceramics, printmaking, sculpture, photography, and computer graphic design), knowledge of multiple aesthetic approaches, and competency in critical thinking and problem solving.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Develop Problem Solving Skills: As a piece of “art” does not automatically “happen” and must be worked on over time (moved, changed, taken through a process), the development of problem solving skills can be applied to work and/or life situations.

·  Develop the ability to use a variety of skills and techniques: Students gain insight into the use of materials, traditional and/or technological.

·  Develop critical thinking skills: Students will develop critical thinking skills through the medium of art and the study of art history.

·  Develop ability to assess a situation and decide on appropriate art strategies: Students will develop the ability to assess a situation and decide on the appropriate art strategies to use.

·  Develop a global aesthetic sense: Students will gain insight into how to perceive the global world around them visually and to be able to reflect on how things “look”.


a478

MA in Media and Professional Communications

The M.A. in Media and Professional Communication is an applied program designed to equip those entering and those already employed in the media and communication industry with skills in the digital media necessary to succeed in today's marketplace.

 

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Effectively communicate with others, with emphasis on the professional world, through written, oral, and multimedia channels.

·  Explain and apply the ethical and legal issues in communications and in the media professions.

·  Explain the development, current state, and emerging trends of media and their relation to civilization.

·  Explain the nature and function of social interactions in interpersonal, group, intercultural, and international contexts.

·  Independently evaluate the effects of media on society and the professions

·  Skillfully conduct research in the area of media (media history, theory, and profession).

 


a479

B.A. in Criminal Justice

The School of Criminal Justice, Political Science and International Studies’ mission is to provide students with a comprehensive education that skillfully integrates theory and application into a holistic and interdisciplinary course of study that prepares its graduates for the wide-ranging career opportunities within America’s criminal justice system.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Communicate effectively, in writing and verbally, the conventions of the English language in a clear, concise, articulate, literate, and professional manner consistent with those of college writing and those specific to the discipline of law and criminal justice.

·  Communicate effectively, in writing and verbally, the conventions of the English language in a clear, concise, articulate, literate, and professional manner consistent with those of college writing and those specific to the discipline of law and criminal justice.

·  Demonstrate a thorough knowledge and understanding of (1) administration of justice, (2) corrections, (3) criminological theory, (4) law adjudication, (5) law enforcement, and (6) research and analytic methods.

·  Demonstrate critical thinking, skeptical inquiry, and the scientific approach to problem solving by selecting and organizing information, identifying assumptions and causal relationships, distinguish between verifiable facts and value claims, determine the credibility of sources, distinguish between warranted or unwarranted reasons or conclusions, detect biases, and evaluate appropriate problem solving strategies, their feasibility and efficacy.

·  Identify, evaluate, assess, and employ appropriate legal, ethical, and professional behaviors and practices within all aspects of their life, including, but not limited to an academic and criminal justice environment.

·  Use, manage, understand, and evaluate technologies to aid and solve practical problems. It involves possessing the knowledge and ability to access and research information utilizing contemporary technologies (hardware and software), as well as the ability to identify and discern qualified data, academic knowledge and information from unqualified data, non-academic knowledge and information.

 


a480

BA in International Studies

This program offers students an eclectic approach in planning careers in international business, government service, foreign service, inter-governmental and non-governmental organizations. This program is enhanced with opportunities for independent study, honors work, internships, locally and in Washington D.C., and study abroad. This Schools houses the Kappa Omicron chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha, the national Honors Society for political and international studies.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Communicate in both written and oral forms effectively.

·  Demonstrate an ability to develop techniques for conflict resolution to solve political, economic, and geographic global problems.

·  Demonstrate an understanding of historical and contemporary international problems and the processes of conflict resolution.

·  Demonstrate an understanding/comprehension of empirical political information and concepts within the context of international studies.

·  Demonstrate use of appropriate research methodology which addresses international issues.

 


a481

BA in Political Science

Fairleigh Dickinson University’s School of Criminal Justice, Political Science, and International Studies serves as an excellent venue for students studying political science – an intriguing discipline that dates back to the philosophical reflections of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle who critically examined the role of government, political activity, and political behavior within society.

Enjoying partnerships with the United Nations and a wide array of government, public, non-profit, and private sector organizations, the study of political science at the Metropolitan Campus offers students a dynamic, challenging, and engaging course of study. Its interdisciplinary curriculum skillfully examines, integrates, analyzes, and applies theoretical and philosophical concepts inherent to political systems and behavior that are influenced by an ever-changing, globalized, and technologically advanced society. The program places a premium on cultivating student knowledge and understanding, critical thinking and reflection, effective communication, information and technological literacy, and ethical and professional behavior.

Specifically, the program examines political systems and behavior from a macro and micro perspective, taking into consideration the impact of globalization and technology that serve to influence political decision-making in areas such as climate change, the environment, migration and immigration, economic policies, economic disparity, hunger, social injustice and inequality, religious extremism, terrorism, and exponentially advancing technologies that influence the political landscape, on both the domestic and international stage.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate orally and in written form the concepts and precepts of political science.

·  Develop an understanding of the impact of law and legal practice in the United States.

·  Enhance the ability to think abstractly and analyze and sort through information.

·  Understand “historical and contemporary examples of political action at local, national and global level.”

 

 


a482

M.A. in Criminal Justice

Fairleigh Dickinson University’s School of Criminal Justice, Political Science and International Studies offers a Master of Arts in Criminal Justice. The program is designed to skillfully integrate theory and practice into a holistic, engaging, and challenging course of study that provides students with advanced knowledge and understanding of the United States Criminal Justice System. Designed to position graduates for success, the program focuses on developing discernable skill sets and competencies necessary for pursuing and/or advancing one’s professional career, emphasizing the importance of critical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, effective communications, social research, and professional development.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Communicate effectively, in writing and verbally, the conventions of the English language in a clear, concise, articulate, literate, and professional manner consistent with those of college writing and those specific to the discipline of law and criminal justice.

·  Demonstrate a thorough knowledge and understanding of (1) administration of justice, (2) corrections, (3) criminological theory, (4) law adjudication, (5) law enforcement, and (6) research and analytic methods.

·  Demonstrate critical thinking, skeptical inquiry, and the scientific approach to problem solving by selecting and organizing information, identifying assumptions and causal relationships, distinguish between verifiable facts and value claims, determine the credibility of sources, distinguish between warranted or unwarranted reasons or conclusions, detect biases, and evaluate appropriate problem solving strategies, their feasibility and efficacy.

·  Identify, evaluate, assess, and employ appropriate legal, ethical, and professional behaviors and practices within all aspects of their life, including, but not limited to an academic and criminal justice environment.

·  Use, manage, understand, and evaluate technologies to aid and solve practical problems. It involves possessing the knowledge and ability to access and research information utilizing contemporary technologies (hardware and software), as well as the ability to identify and discern qualified data, academic knowledge and information from unqualified data, non-academic knowledge and information.

 


a483

B.A. in English Language & Literature

At its most fundamental level literature explores what it means to be a human being in this world and tries to describe what our human experience is like. As such, literature pushes us to confront the large human questions that have plagued humankind for centuries: issues of fate and free will, issues relating to our role in the universe, our relationship to God, and our relationships with others. Studying literature not only helps us to understand the complexity of these questions intellectually, but because of its very nature, it allows us to experience these tensions vicariously. Literature does not just tell us about human experience; it recreates it in a way we can feel and visualize. In other words, it calls for a total response from us--it stretches us beyond who we are.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Discuss and analyze issues raised in studying English from a historical perspective.

·  Evaluate and appreciate the intellectual and creative achievements of writers in English from postcolonial countries and culture as well.

·  Paraphrase, interpret, analyze, and comprehend literary texts and ideas.

·  Understand the modes of inquiry used in various approaches to the study of English literature including, but not limited to, critical analysis.

·  Write clearly and persuasively.

 

 


a484

B.A. in English Quest (Elementary Education)

Students must complete 128 credits for a B.A. or B.S. in a liberal arts or science major appropriate for the area of teacher certification. This includes at least 30 credits in education courses required for elementary or secondary certification -- of which a maximum of 15 credits may be applied as dual undergraduate and graduate credit to both the B.A./B.S. and M.A.T. degrees -- plus 15 credits in graduate-level educational methodology courses.

 

 

 


a485

B.A. in English/Quest (Secondary Education)

This unique program provides students the opportunity to pursue professional studies for teacher preparation leading to state teacher licensure while earning a bachelor's degree in a liberal arts or science major and a Master's of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) degree. The program is open to students who wish to be certified to teach at the secondary school level in the area of their liberal arts or science major, or in elementary education. Both tracks result in the B.A. or B.S. degree in a liberal arts/science major with graduate-level advanced course work toward a Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) degree.

 


a486

B.A. in Humanities

Emphasizing critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, as well as interdisciplinary approaches to problem solving, the Program in Humanities is dedicated to preparing students for professional life. The acquisition of broad-based skills emphasized by the Program in Humanities enhances effective performance in whatever career track you might choose.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate critical engagement with texts, reasoning, information literacy and writing skills that contribute to the study of the humanities.

·  Explain the basic principles of the humanities, employ discipline specific terms, and describe various conventions particular to the humanities discipline.

·  Identify and analyze how literary, historical, cultural and/or philosophical ideas and/or events have affected the creation and/or reception of the humanities discipline.

 


a487

BA in History

History students learn to analyze historical evidence and arguments and to communicate their ideas effectively in speech and in writing. The study of history provides students with a substantial body of knowledge of the past and an understanding of different eras and cultures. History students develop critical thinking skills that prepare them for a lifetime of learning and engagement as educated citizens.

The History major consists of 33 credits of History courses, 30 of which are electives. The sole required course is the capstone seminar, in which students write a substantial research paper (approximately 20 pages) based on primary sources.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Analyze historical sources.

·  Communicate effectively in writing and speech.

·  Conduct historical research.

·  Evaluate multiple sources.

·  Produce a substantial research paper.

 


a488

BA in Philosophy

(NOTE THAT THIS PROGRAM IS NO LONGER ACCEPTING MAJORS AND WILL OFFICIALLY CLOSE AS OF FALL 2016)

The school’s Program in Philosophy and Religion offers a philosophy major dedicated to producing graduates who will embrace “the examined life,” learning to ask probing questions regarding critical aspects of human existence. Graduates acquire skills in critical thinking and moral reasoning, as well as knowledge of world philosophies and religions. They also become aware of how ideas, including both secular and religious commitments and values, continue to shape our world as they encounter fundamental questions asked by every generation of humans in cultures across the globe. The major prepares the student both for lives as global citizens and for excellence in a variety of professional settings, including (but not limited to) law, business, education, and the non-profit sector.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Embrace the "examined life" and will learn to ask probing questions regarding critical aspects of human existence.

·  Understand important areas of philosophical inquiry-including logic, ethics, philosophy of science, and political philosophy.

·  Understand the philosophical and religious dimensions of crucial global issues, such as human rights, genocide, and the global environment.

 

 


a489

B.S. in Biochemistry

The emphasis of the biochemistry curriculum is at the chemical and molecular level and is strongly based on a chemistry foundation. It is designed for meeting the entrance requirements for medical and dental schools, and to prepare the students for careers in biochemistry and for graduate study in this important area.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate a solid foundation in science, including: vocabulary, concepts, methods, and procedures.

·  Demonstrate qualitative and quantitative critical reasoning skills.

·  Develop skills in oral and written modes of communication (including mathematical and graphical).

·  Develop skills to work independently and with others.

·  Excel at utilizing information resources including primary and secondary literature in the field.

·  Exhibit a solid foundation for future independent study (life-long learning).

 


a490

B.S. in Biology

The Biology Program of the School of Natural Sciences of Fairleigh Dickinson University is committed to providing students with a solid foundation in both the theoretical concepts and practical applications of biology. School of Natural Sciences Biology graduates will be well prepared to further their education in graduate school or to pursue a variety of careers in biological sciences.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Explain biological concepts.

·  Gather data that can be analyzed.

·  Read and evaluate professional scientific literature.

·  Research a biological topic using traditional and computer technology.

·  Use the scientific method and understand its strengths and weaknesses.

·  Utilize mathematical reasoning and quantitative skills in biology.

·  Write and communicate science.


a491

B.S. in Chemistry

The Bachelor of Science with a major in Chemistry program of the School of Natural Sciences is committed to providing students with a solid foundation in chemistry so that they may pursue a variety of career objectives including employment in the chemical industry, admission to graduate school, and pre-professional preparation.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate a solid foundation in science, including: vocabulary, concepts, methods, and procedures.

·  Develop skills to work independently and with others.

·  Develop skills in oral and written modes of communication (including mathematical and graphical).

·  Exhibit a solid foundation for future independent study (lifelong learning).

·  Demonstrate qualitative and quantitative critical reasoning skills.

·  Excel at utilizing information resources including primary and secondary literature.

 


a492

B.S. in Marine Biology

The Marine Biology Program of the School of Natural Sciences of Fairleigh Dickinson University is committed to providing students with a solid foundation in both the theoretical concepts and practical applications of marine biology. School of Natural Sciences Marine Biology graduates will be well prepared to further their education in graduate school or to pursue a variety of careers in marine biological sciences.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Write and communicate science.

·  Utilize mathematical reasoning and quantitative skills in marine biology.

·  Use the scientific method and understand its strengths and weaknesses.

·  Research a marine biological topic using traditional and computer technology.

·  Read and evaluate professional scientific literature .

·  Gather data that can be analyzed.

·  Explain marine biological concepts.

 

 


a493

B.S. in Science

The Science Program of the School of Natural Sciences of Fairleigh Dickinson University is committed to providing students with a solid foundation in both the theoretical concepts and practical applications of science. School of Natural Sciences Science graduates will be well prepared to further their education in graduate school or to pursue a variety of careers in the sciences.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Explain science concepts.

·  Gather data that can be analyzed.

·  Read and evaluate professional scientific literature.

·  Research a science topic using traditional and computer technology.

·  Use the scientific method and understand its strengths and weaknesses.

·  Utilize mathematical reasoning and quantitative skills in science.

·  Write and communicate science.

 

 


a494

M.S. Biology / Minor in Business

The minor in Business of the MS in Biology Program of the School of Natural Sciences of Fairleigh Dickinson University is designed to enable biology graduate students to have a concentration in the business areas of either management, marketing or finance.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Apply the scientific method.

·  Explain biological concepts.

·  Gather data that can be analyzed.

·  Read and critically evaluate professional scientific literature.

·  Research a biological topic using traditional and computer technology.

·  Utilize mathematical reasoning and quantitative skills in biology.

·  Write and communicate science that is of publishing quality.

 


a495

M.S. in Cosmetic Science

This program, the first of its kind in New Jersey, was introduced in 1982 as a Master of Arts in Science with a concentration in Cosmetic Science. The current name, Master of Science in Cosmetic Science, more accurately reflects its scientific content. This program continues to fulfill the needs of those responsible for creating commercial products in the cosmetics, toiletries, and fragrance industries. It enables practitioners to learn the latest advances in their field and helps students to develop the skills necessary for senior assignments in the cosmetics industry. It is also geared to technologists aspiring to supervisory roles in the laboratory or plant. For those without industrial experience, the program can launch a career in the cosmetic industry.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate qualitative and quantitative critical reasoning skills.

·  Demonstrate solid foundation in this specialized field, including the vocabulary, concepts, methods, and procedures.

·  Develop skills in oral and written modes of communication (including mathematical and graphical).

·  Develop skills to work independently and with others.

·  Excel at utilizing information resources including primary and secondary literature in the field.

·  Exhibit a solid foundation for future independent study (life-long learning).

 


a496

M.S. in Chemistry (with Pharmaceutical Chemistry Concentration)

FDU’s Master of Science in Chemistry with a concentration in Pharmaceutical Science degree is committed to fulfill the practical and intellectual needs of chemists pursuing research and development careers within the pharmaceutical industry. For those without industrial experience, the program can help launch a career in the pharmaceutical industry. It is also geared to current technologists aspiring to supervisory roles in the laboratory or manufacturing site.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Demonstrate qualitative and quantitative critical reasoning skills.

·  Demonstrate solid foundation in this specialized field, including the vocabulary, concepts, methods, and procedures.

·  Develop skills in oral and written modes of communication (including mathematical and graphical).

·  Develop skills to work independently and with others.

·  Excel at utilizing information resources including primary and secondary literature in the field.

·  Exhibit a solid foundation for future independent study (life-long learning).

 


a497

B.A. in Psychology

The School of Psychology on the Metropolitan Campus of FDU is nationally recognized and offers curricula suitable for both professional careers and personal growth.

The School of Psychology offers a four-year B.A. program with optional tracks in addictive behaviors, forensic psychology, industrial/organizational psychology, and mental health.

The mental health and clinical social work tracks provide specialized course work and practical experience that will make one more attractive to employers (e.g., mental health services, child care, casework) immediately after graduation. These tracks also provide a competitive edge when seeking admission to applied graduate programs (e.g., clinical & school psychology; social work). The course work gives an in-depth analysis of psychopathology and permits a greater understanding of the various therapeutic approaches. At the same time, students receive “hands-on” experience at a practicum site of their choice to help facilitate the integration of theory and practice.

The forensic psychology track affords students an introduction to the dynamic fields of criminal justice and forensic psychology, integration of forensic science disciplines with criminal investigations, and training in psychological theory, research methods, and the application of psychological principles to specific areas of the legal system. At the same time, students enrolled in this track may receive "hands-on" experience at a practicum site of their choice to help facilitate the integration of theory and practice, and will come away with an interdisciplinary background appropriate for careers in psychology, social work, law enforcement, or other criminal justice professions.

The consumer psychology and organizational behavior/human resources(OB/HR) tracks are ideal for students who want an applied business-oriented focus to their training, but do not want to be business majors. Students in these tracks will take the required core psychology courses along with courses from the management (OB/HR track) or marketing (consumer psychology track) departments. The consumer psychology track will provide students with an understanding of human responses to product- and service-related information and experiences. This track will prepare students to work in private industry, non-profit, and government agencies in positions related to marketing research, advertising, designing/evaluating community-wide interventions, public health campaigns, social marketing, etc. The OB/HR track will provide students with a background in organizational processes and decision-making related to personnel selection, training and management. This track will prepare students to work in private industry, non-profit, and government agencies in positions related to human resources and/or management consulting.

The accelerated B.A./M.A. programs in general/theoretical and forensic psychology combine the undergraduate B.A. in Psychology and graduate (M.A.) degrees in these areas. These programs allow students to complete a bachelor's and a master's degree in just five years. The savings in time and tuition are accomplished through a process of cross-crediting 15 undergraduate and graduate credits. Within the undergraduate portion of the program, it is possible to complete one of the specialized undergraduate tracks described above, without incurring additional undergraduate credits. The combined B.A. in Psychology (clinical social work track) and Master's in Social Work (in conjunction with New York University's School of Social Work) also allows students to complete the typical B.A./M.A. course sequence in five years, rather than the usual six years of full-time study.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Understand and apply basic research methods in psychology, including research design, data analysis, and interpretation.)

·  Graduates will be able to write effectively, communicate clearly in the language of the discipline of psychology, and utilize proper writing mechanics.

·  Graduates will be able to use critical and creative thinking, skeptical inquiry, and when possible, the scientific approach to solve problems related to behavior and mental processes.

·  Graduates will demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology.

·  Graduates will speak effectively, communicate knowledge in the discipline of psychology, and utilize proper oral presentation mechanics.

 

 


a498

M.A. (plus certification) in School Psychology

The school psychology program provides the education to become a professional school psychologist at the master's plus certification level (60 credits). The program emphasizes the development of skills to provide direct service to school-aged children and the development of competencies necessary for maximizing the educational potential of all children. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills acquired to foster learning and social development. The program features opportunities to develop special competencies in areas such as assessment, identifying and treating behavior problems in children and adolescents, utilizing curriculum-based measurement tools to assess school health and student progress, and assisting students on the autism spectrum in strengthening academic and life skills.

·  School psychologists have knowledge of behavioral, mental health, collaborative, and/or other consultation models and methods and of their application to particular situations. School psychologists collaborate effectively with others in planning and decision-making processes at the individual, group, and system levels.

·  School psychologists have knowledge of family systems, including family strengths and influences on student development, learning, and behavior, and of methods to involve families in education and service delivery. School psychologists work effectively with families, educators, and others in the community to promote and provide comprehensive services to children and families.

·  School psychologists have knowledge of general education, special education, and other educational and related services. They understand schools and other settings as systems. School psychologists work with individuals and groups to facilitate policies and practices that create and maintain safe, supportive, and effective learning environments for children and others.

·  School psychologists have knowledge of human development and psychopathology and of associated biological, cultural, and social influences on human behavior. School psychologists provide or contribute to prevention and intervention programs that promote the mental health and physical well-being of students.

·  School psychologists have knowledge of human developmental processes, techniques to assess these processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social skills. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, develop appropriate behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social goals for students of varying abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness limited to, consultation, behavioral assessment/intervention, and counseling.

·  School psychologists have knowledge of human learning processes, techniques to assess these processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of cognitive and academic skills. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, develop appropriate cognitive and academic goals for students with different abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions. Such interventions include, but are not limited to, instructional interventions and consultation.

·  School psychologists have knowledge of individual differences, abilities, and disabilities and of the potential influence of biological, social, cultural, ethnic, experiential, socioeconomic, gender-related, and linguistic factors in development and learning. School psychologists demonstrate the sensitivity and skills needed to work with individuals of diverse characteristics and to implement strategies selected and/or adapted based on individual characteristics, strengths, and needs.

·  School psychologists have knowledge of information sources and technology relevant to their work. School psychologist's access, evaluate, and utilize information sources and technology in ways that safeguard or enhance the quality of services.

·  School psychologists have knowledge of research, statistics, and evaluation methods. School psychologists evaluate research, translate research into practice, and understand research design and statistics in sufficient depth to plan and conduct investigations and program evaluations for improvement of services.

·  School psychologists have knowledge of the history and foundations of their profession; of various service models and methods; of public policy development applicable to services to children and families; and of ethical, professional, and legal standards. School psychologists practice in ways that are consistent with applicable standards, are involved in their profession, and have the knowledge and skills needed to acquire career-long professional development.

·  School psychologists have knowledge of varied models and methods of assessment that yield information useful in identifying strengths and needs, in understanding problems, and in measuring progress and accomplishments. School psychologists use such models and methods as part of a systematic process to collect data and other information, translate assessment results into empirically-based decisions about service delivery, and evaluate the outcomes of services. Data-based decision-making permeates every aspect of professional practice.

 


a499

M.A. in General/Theoretical Psychology

The 36-credit M.A. Program in General/Theoretical Psychology provides broad-based training that is intended to prepare students for occupations in various scientific and professional areas of psychology. It is also appropriate for those students planning to pursue subsequent training at the doctoral level.

The general-theoretical program is designed to provide preparation for (a) further study at the doctoral level in more specialized substantive areas or (b) careers in industry (e.g., advertising/market research, organizational consulting), government (e.g., program evaluation, criminal justice research), education, or health sectors. The program is expected to take two years to complete for full-time students, but can be completed on a part-time basis for those working full-time. Students can be accepted for either the Fall or Spring semester; there are no application deadlines.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Match research hypotheses to appropriate research designs and statistical approaches and to summarize research results in written format.

·  Review and critically evaluate psychological research in a given domain and to develop testable hypotheses in these areas.

·  Demonstrate fundamental knowledge of the major theories and contemporary research findings across core domains of psychology (e.g., clinical, developmental, personality, physiological, & social)

 

 


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M.A. Program in Forensic Psychology

Our program at Fairleigh Dickinson University is designed to offer our students the maximum possible exposure to the broad field of forensic psychology while at the same time streamlining a curriculum that allows students to finish in 18 months. Students are exposed through coursework to all of the critical areas of forensic psychology practice. In addition, students gain clinical experience through the completion of a 300-hour externship placement, and have the option to participate in forensic research and may also do a thesis.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Identify appropriate analyses to answer research questions and will be able to conduct statistical analyses.

·  Present on a topic relevant to psychologists in a manner understandable to audiences of various level of understanding of psychology.

·  Propose plans for assessing relevant forensic issues, such as violence, sexual recidivism, child custody, competency to stand trial.

·  Understand and apply ethical guidelines in clinical, research, and forensic scenarios.

·  Understand clinical theories, practice, and testing with forensic clients.

·  Understand how to assess psychopathology and differentiate diagnoses with similar symptoms.

·  Understand psychological and biological theories of criminal behavior.

·  Understand the unique concerns and demands of interviewing forensic clients.

·  Write papers, integrating empirical research on a topic and identify research needs.

 


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Ph.D. Program in Clinical Psychology

The Ph.D. Program in Clinical Psychology is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of the American Psychological Association (APA) and is a program member of the Council of University Directors of Clinical Psychology (CUDCP). The program adheres to the scientist/practitioner model of training, and requires a number of clinical and research practica in addition to an extensive course curriculum. This is a four-year plus internship, full-time program designed to prepare skilled psychologists who are capable of serving as clinicians, appreciative of the relationship between science and clinical practice, and capable of conducting sound research.

The scientist-practitioner orientation emphasizes academic content areas of psychology and views clinical training as growing directly out of foundations in psychological theory and research. It reflects the program’s position that a competent and effective clinician is a scientist-practitioner, well-versed not only in clinical techniques and methods, but also in the theoretical and research-based underpinnings of various approaches.

As an expression of the scientist-practitioner model, the sequence of courses in the program emphasizes a thorough preparation in theoretical psychology and methodology. The sequence becomes the matrix against which students receive applied training in clinical psychology. For example, the first year of the program exposes students to a course in the theory of measurement prior to course work in intellectual assessment. Theoretical foundations in personality and psychopathology are explored prior to behavioral and personality assessment.

Concurrent with the work in assessment, students begin study of the theory, research, and practice of psychotherapy. The second year of course work expands students' knowledge of treatment procedures, specialized populations, and related topics. In addition, the student completes two semesters of statistics (research design and analysis) in the second year.

By the end of the third year, students are prepared to begin their dissertation research under the mentorship of the faculty.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Design and implement research.

·  Develop integrated case formulations and modify them as appropriate, in light of additional data.

·  Develop, and modify as appropriate, a comprehensive treatment plan.

·  Evaluate existing research literature critically.

·  Formulate informed diagnoses.

·  Identify ethical, professional, and legal issues in assessment and treatment and adhere to the appropriate APA ethical guidelines.

·  Identify issues relevant to diverse clinical populations and modify assessment and treatment accordingly.

·  Implement evidence-based practice in treatment delivery.

 


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Postdoctoral M.S. in Clinical Psychopharmacology

The M.S. Program in Clinical Psychopharmacology is dedicated to enhancing licensed psychologists' ability to interact and collaborate with other health professionals in the management of patients with mental and behavioral disorders. The program is also committed to training psychologists to the level of competence appropriate for independent prescriptive authority. The didactic program uses a combination of distance and online teaching methods, emphasizing applied learning via case formulation, to achieve these goals. Participants are also eligible to participate in a supervised clinical experience, which prepares the participant for independent practice. This clinical experience uses a mentoring model geared to the mastery of core clinical competencies. The format of the program allows for a rigorous and demanding learning environment, as is appropriate given the goals of the program, while providing the flexibility needed for busy professionals to complete the training. The program adopts a learner-centered approach that builds on the tradition and excellence of the scientist-practitioner training model, enhancing scientific and professional knowledge by delivering high-quality education through the latest technology and peer-interaction techniques.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Address legal and ethical issues related to the prescribing of psychopharmacological drugs, standard of care issues, and management of patients receiving psychotropic medications.

·  Apply the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system and the principles of neuroscience to understanding the etiology and treatment of mental disorders.

·  Assess and manage patients using an integration of psychopharmacological and psychosocial techniques and perspectives.

·  Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of clinical psychopharmacology with an emphasis on pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, neurotoxicity, drug delivery, and drug interactions.

·  Demonstrate core knowledge in the areas of anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology of human body systems.

·  Identify medical conditions that significantly affect the treatment of mental disorders, either by mimicking mental disorders or by impacting on the choice of an appropriate treatment regimen.

·  Implement psychopharmacological interventions for specific categories of mental disorders.

 


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Psy.D. in School Psychology

Fairleigh Dickinson University's doctoral program in School Psychology is an innovative, applied professional psychology program that leads to the Doctorate of Psychology (Psy.D.) degree. The program's emphasis is on providing students with practical skills directly applicable to their daily work with children, youth and families. FDU's other doctoral program -- the Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology -- is fully accredited by the APA, and students in the PsyD. program in School Psychology share many of the same courses and learning experiences.

School Psychology(Psy.D.)

The School of Psychology offers two tracks for the school psychology doctoral degree: a five year full-time program for applicants with a bachelor’s degree in psychology or a related field and an advanced program for those who already have a master’s degree and the certification in school psychology.

School Psychology(Five-year Psy.D.)

The five-year school psychology doctoral program is an integration of theoretical and foundational knowledge and applied professional training for those committed to working with children and adolescents in school and school-related setting. The program’s goal is to prepare individuals to assume leadership positions within school, school-related and academic setting. The program prepares students for certification in school psychology and eligibility for license as psychologist.

The program is full-time program. Classroom experiences are integrated with field-based experiences in a multitude of settings, beginning in the first semester of study. Classes are held in late afternoon and evening, providing ample opportunity for practicum and research. The program’s electric orientation and wide range of course work provides education in research, consultation, assessment, prevention, program evaluation, neuropsychology and psychopharmacology. There are opportunities for students to work closely with program faculty to develop specialized areas of interest and research. During their fourth year of study, students are expected to complete a doctoral dissertation in the form of an original clinical investigation, a form of an original clinical investigation, a program evaluation, case study or meta-analysis. Students are also expected to comprehensive examination and the PRAXIS exam in school psychology.

The program culminates (fifth year) in a yearlong internship in a school or related clinical setting. Students are encouraged to apply for APA-approved internships. Stipends supporting half tuition are available for highly qualified students. The granting of a tuition stipend requires a commitment of 12 hours per week as a research assistant.

·  Learning Outcome 1- Data-based Decision Making: School psychologists have knowledge of varied models and methods of assessment that yield information useful in identifying strengths and needs, in understanding problems, and in measuring progress and accomplishments. School psychologists use such models and methods as part of a systematic process to collect data and other information, translate assessment results into empirically-based decisions about service delivery, and evaluate the outcomes of services. Data-based decision-making permeates every aspect of professional practice.

·  Learning Outcome 2- Consultation and Collaboration: School psychologists have knowledge of behavioral, mental health, collaborative, and/or other consultation models and methods and of their application to particular situations. School psychologists collaborate effectively with others in planning and decision-making processes at the individual, group, and system levels.

·  Learning Outcome 3 - Effective Instruction and Development of Cognitive/Academic Skills: School psychologists have knowledge of human learning processes, techniques to assess these processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of cognitive and academic skills. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, develop appropriate cognitive and academic goals for students with different abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions. Such interventions include, but are not limited to, instructional interventions and consultation.         

·  Learning Outcome 4 - Socialization and Development of Life Skills: School psychologists have knowledge of human developmental processes, techniques to assess these processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social skills. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, develop appropriate behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social goals for students of varying abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness limited to, consultation, behavioral assessment/intervention, and counseling.

·  Learning Outcome 5 - Student Diversity in Development and Learning: School psychologists have knowledge of individual differences, abilities, and disabilities and of the potential influence of biological, social, cultural, ethnic, experiential, socioeconomic, gender-related, and linguistic factors in development and learning. School psychologists demonstrate the sensitivity and skills needed to work with individuals of diverse characteristics and to implement strategies selected and/or adapted based on individual characteristics, strengths, and needs.

·  Learning Outcome 6 - School and Systems Organization, Policy Development, and Climate: School psychologists have knowledge of general education, special education, and other educational and related services. They understand schools and other settings as systems. School psychologists work with individuals and groups to facilitate policies and practices that create and maintain safe, supportive, and effective learning environments for children and others.

·  Learning Outcome 7 - Prevention, Crisis Intervention, and Mental Health: School psychologists have knowledge of human development and psychopathology and of associated biological, cultural, and social influences on human behavior. School psychologists provide or contribute to prevention and intervention programs that promote the mental health and physical well-being of students.

·  Learning Outcome 8 - Home/School Community Collaboration: School psychologists have knowledge of family systems, including family strengths and influences on student development, learning, and behavior, and of methods to involve families in education and service delivery. School psychologists work effectively with families, educators, and others in the community to promote and provide comprehensive services to children and families.

·  Learning Outcome 9 - Research and Program Evaluation: School psychologists have knowledge of research, statistics, and evaluation methods. School psychologists evaluate research, translate research into practice, and understand research design and statistics in sufficient depth to plan and conduct investigations and program evaluations for improvement of services.

·  Learning Outcome 10 - School Psychology Practice and Development: School psychologists have knowledge of the history and foundations of their profession; of various service models and methods; of public policy development applicable to services to children and families; and of ethical, professional, and legal standards. School psychologists practice in ways that are consistent with applicable standards, are involved in their profession, and have the knowledge and skills needed to acquire career-long professional development.

·  Learning Outcome 11 -  Information Technology: School psychologists have knowledge of information sources and technology relevant to their work. School psychologist's access, evaluate, and utilize information sources and technology in ways that safeguard or enhance the quality of services.

 


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A.S. in Radiography

The course of study to become a radiographer is an intensive, 24-month education that results in an Associate in Science degree in Radiography with a Certificate in Radiography. It is designed for those who wish to learn the basic and specialized area of radiologic technology. All university courses are held on Teaneck- Hackensack Campus of Fairleigh Dickinson University, and clinical education is held at The Valley Hospital. Following the program completion, graduates are eligible to take the certification examination administered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists and for licensure by the New Jersey Radiologic Technology Board of Examiners.

Radiologic technology is a health-care discipline that utilizes ionizing radiation for diagnosis of disease. The radiographer, a person who produces images of the human body for diagnostic purposes, is under the supervision of a physician. The radiography program is sponsored by The Valley Hospital in , Ridgewood, N.J., and has an affiliation with Fairleigh Dickinson University. The Valley Hospital School of Radiography is accredited by the New Jersey Radiologic Technology Board of Examiners and the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). The course of study to become a radiographer is an intensive, 24-month education that results in an Associate in Science degree in Radiography with a Certificate in Radiography. It is designed for those who wish to learn the basic and specialized area of radiologic technology. All university courses are held on Teaneck- Hackensack Campus of Fairleigh Dickinson University, and clinical education is held at The Valley Hospital. Following the program completion, graduates are eligible to take the certification examination administered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists and for licensure by the New Jersey Radiologic Technology Board of Examiners.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Communicate effectively and proficiently with other members of the health care team in providing health promotion and disease prevention interventions as measured by satisfactory completion of relevant coursework.

·  Demonstrate cultural competence in working with individuals from various backgrounds without prejudice or stereotyping, in demonstrating an appreciation for cultural diversity and the uniqueness of all human beings as measured by satisfactory completion of relevant coursework.

·  Exhibit leadership behavior guided by ethical/legal principles consistent with the healthcare profession in meeting the global health challenge by participating in community service and school governance.

·  Gain the necessary preparation for baccalaureate studies as measured by satisfactory completion of all of the undergraduate courses in the program.

·  Integrate current evidenced-based technological information and research when planning, implementing and evaluating outcomes of care in a variety of health care settings as measured by satisfactory completion of relevant coursework.

·  Synthesize knowledge from liberal arts, social sciences and professional education to meet the health needs of a changing society and world as measured by using scientific rationale and completion of relevant coursework.

·  Use scientific reasoning analysis and evidence-based literature to support decision making and problem solving strategies, including outcome measurement as measured by satisfactory completion of relevant coursework.

 


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B.S. in Medical Technology

The courses prescribed by the American Society for Clinical Pathology are completed in the first three years. Following this, application must be made to an approved program for a 12- to 15-month training period, which qualifies a student for admittance to the examination of the Board of Registry. The Bachelor of Science degree is awarded upon the completion of the clinical program.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Communicate effectively and proficiently: Communicate effectively and proficiently with other members of the health care team in providing health promotion and disease prevention interventions as measured by satisfactory completion of relevant coursework.

·  Use scientific reasoning analysis and evidence based literature: Use scientific reasoning analysis and evidence based literature to support decision making and problem solving strategies, including outcome measurement as measured by satisfactory completion of relevant coursework.

·  Synthesize knowledge: Synthesize knowledge from liberal arts, social sciences and professional education to meet the health needs of a changing society and world as measured by using scientific rationale and completion of relevant coursework.

·  Integrate current evidenced­ based technological information and research:  Integrate current evidenced-based technological information and research when planning, implementing and evaluating outcomes of care in a variety of health care settings as measured by satisfactory completion of relevant coursework.

·  Exhibit leadership behavior:  Exhibit leadership behavior guided by ethical/legal principles consistent with the healthcare profession in meeting the global health challenge by participating in community service and school governance.

·  Demonstrate cultural competence:  Demonstrate cultural competence in working with individuals from various backgrounds without prejudice or stereotyping, in demonstrating an appreciation for cultural diversity and the uniqueness of all human beings as measured by satisfactory completion of relevant coursework.

·  Gain the necessary preparation:  Gain the necessary preparation for graduate studies as measured by satisfactory completion of all of the undergraduate courses in the program.

 

 


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B.S. in Nursing (B.S.N.)

The goal of the nursing program is to prepare a professional nurse to provide comprehensive nursing care to persons and families in all environments where health care is required.

Laboratory experiences are concurrent with nursing theory and begin at the first semester of sophomore-level courses. Beginning at the sophomore level, students are assigned to a variety of clinical laboratory experiences at various locations including hospitals, clinics, nursing homes and community health agencies. The program is reviewed and evaluated periodically by the faculty, students, consumers, community health-care agencies and external accrediting bodies to assess quality and relevance.

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing program is open to high school graduates, to college graduates holding a baccalaureate degree in a field other than nursing and to diploma or associate degree R.N.s. College graduates attend an accelerated track that is identical in nursing content to the four-year nursing program. The accelerated nursing program offers two options: one year program, beginning each year in May, that can be completed in one calendar year following fulfillment of all prerequisites and two year program, beginning each year in September, that can be completed in two calendar years following fulfillment of all prerequisites.

Nursing classes begin in the freshman year, followed by clinical rotations in a variety of health care facilities. Specialty areas studied include: nursing care of adults, nursing care of individuals with psychosocial problems, nursing care of children, women’s health, rehabilitative nursing and community health nursing. This program offers both full and part-time study options.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Apply critical thinking skills in the nursing care of individuals, families, groups and communities measured by the effective use of the nursing process in all aspects of care; prioritize the needs of clients, ability to see multiple sides of controversial questions, application of problem solving techniques in approaching nursing situations in the classroom, laboratory and clinical areas.

·  Articulate and integrate a personal belief system that concerns human beings, environment, health and nursing as a process as evidenced by satisfactory evaluations of clinical experiences

·  Collaborate with clients, member of the health team and others in order to maximize human health potential of clients demonstrated by satisfactory evaluations of clinical experiences.

·  Demonstrate cultural competence in applying the nursing process through the effective use of a cultural assessment tool in working with individuals from various cultural backgrounds without prejudice or stereotyping, in demonstrating an appreciation of cultural diversity and the uniqueness of all human beings. This competency is measured by satisfactory completion of relevant course requirements and clinical experiences.

·  Demonstrate professional role behaviors, guided by ethical/legal principles and standards of practice as evidenced by readiness to pass the NCLEX-RN from passing scores on the standard predictive examinations; satisfactory clinical and faculty evaluations.

·  Exhibit leadership behaviors consistent with the profession in meeting the global health challenge by participating in community service and school governance.

·  Gain the necessary preparation for graduate studies as shown by satisfactory completion of the undergraduate program and NCLEX-RN.

·  Incorporate values of human caring in the application of the nursing process as demonstrated by care based on theory of caring, respect and empathy for individuals, families, groups and communities. Evidence of this competency includes satisfactory clinical evaluations.

·  Provide holistic care that contributes to health, recovery and peaceful death using the concept of levels of prevention as demonstrated by satisfactory evaluations of clinical experiences.

·  Synthesize knowledge from liberal arts and professional education to meet the health needs of a changing society as measured by nursing care based on scientific rationale and satisfactory evaluation of clinical experiences.

·  Use research and problem solving strategies, including outcomes measurement and evidence-based practice to improve healthcare of individuals, families, groups and communities as shown by the completion of classroom and clinical assignments.

 

 


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B.S. in Radiologic Technology

The Bachelor of Science degree in radiologic technology is an advanced standing program designed for the professional development of registered radiological technologists. The program’s objectives are to provide educational opportunities for radiographers who have graduated from accredited associate degree programs and hospital certificate programs and are certified to practice. In addition, the program will provide career mobility and educational articulation for these students.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Communicate effectively and proficiently with other members of the health care team in providing health promotion and disease prevention interventions as measured by satisfactory completion of relevant coursework.

·  Demonstrate cultural competence in working with individuals from various backgrounds without prejudice or stereotyping, in demonstrating an appreciation for cultural diversity and the uniqueness of all human beings as measured by satisfactory completion of relevant coursework.

·  Exhibit leadership behavior guided by ethical/legal principles consistent with the healthcare profession in meeting the global health challenge by participating in community service and school governance.

·  Gain the necessary preparation for graduate studies as measured by satisfactory completion of all of the undergraduate courses in the program.

·  Integrate current evidenced-based technological information and research when planning, implementing and evaluating outcomes of care in a variety of health care settings as measured by satisfactory completion of relevant coursework.

·  Synthesize knowledge from liberal arts, social sciences and professional education to meet the health needs of a changing society and world as measured by using scientific rationale and completion of relevant coursework.

·  Use scientific reasoning analysis and evidence-based literature to support decision making and problem solving strategies, including outcome measurement as measured by satisfactory completion of relevant coursework.

 


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Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree program educates nurses for the highest level of clinically expert practice, including sophisticated diagnostic and treatment competencies. These competencies, combined with a focus on health promotion, disease prevention, and health education, prepare DNPs for leadership practice roles on the front line of their profession. Recognizing that advanced practice preparation requires education at the doctoral level, this program provides intra- and interdisciplinary collaboration in both the education and practice settings.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Apply information technology and research methods to establish evidence-based outcomes as the best support for practice. Indicators/Measures: Completion of courses in Management of Information Systems, Statistics, Research I and Health Quality Assessment and Outcomes.

·  Demonstrate an advanced level of clinical judgment, cultural sensitivity and system knowledge in designing and delivering care to improve the health outcomes of individuals and aggregates. Indicators/Measures: Data on patient outcomes, completion of evidence-based capstone project and residency requirements; evidence of influence on health policy and practice throughout the field.

·  Demonstrate leadership in the development of institutional, local, federal and/or international health policy. Indicators/measures: Completion of courses in Health Care Delivery Systems and Public Policy, Leadership , Management and Entrepreneurship, Health Disparities, Social, Ethical, and Legal Issues, and Residency I & II; editorial activities such as serving as peer reviewer of journal articles and books, or serving as editor for nursing journals; collaboration in the development of interdisciplinary standards for patient care.

·  Design programs or initiatives that will ensure patient safety improved patient outcomes that demonstrate professional accountability. Indicators/Measures: Patient outcomes data, completion of Residency I & II requirements and individually directed CQI (continuous quality improvement) project.

·  Exhibit leadership behaviors consistent with the profession by participating in community service , school and healthcare agency governance Indicators/Measures: completion of Residency I & II.

·  Integrate nursing science with knowledge from biophysical, psychosocial, analytical and organizational sciences as the basis for the highest level of nursing practice. Indicators/measures: Successful completion of the DNP curriculum, peer reviewed publications of clinical research and practice related to the prevention of disease, health promotion and expert practice.

·  Provide intra-and inter-professional leadership in accomplishing change in healthcare and complex health care delivery systems. Indicators/Measures: completion of evidence-based capstone project, residency requirements, evaluation of healthcare outcomes, presentations of clinical research and indicators of expert practice in professional meetings and conferences.

·  Synthesize concepts related to clinical prevention in developing and evaluating interventions to address health promotion/disease prevention. Indicators/Measures: completion of courses in Health Quality Assessment and Outcomes, Epidemiology, Genomics and Global Health, Health Systems and Policy, state, regional, national and/or international recognition awards for expert practice and initiatives.

 


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Doctorate in Physical Therapy (D.P.T.)

The Physical Therapy Program is a collaborative program between Fairleigh Dickinson University (FDU) and Rutgers University. The program specializes in doctoral-level education for individuals wishing to become physical therapists. Students in the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program receive state-of-the-art education that prepares them to be in the forefront of the physical therapy profession. The students take the Bachelor of Science in Biology and upon completion of three years, the students go to Rutgers University

 


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M.S. in Nursing (M.S.N.)

The Master of Science in Nursing Program prepares individuals as adult gerontology, family, and family psychiatric/mental health nurse practitioners, forensic specialists, nurse educators and nurse information system specialists.

At the completion of this program students will be able to:

·  Advance nursing science and practice through scholarly pursuits, interdisciplinary collaboration and the exercise of leadership in health care and education.

·  Critically evaluate research findings for application to advanced practice roles to ensure quality by demonstrating competence in completing an evidence based practice master project.

·  Demonstrate advanced knowledge and skill in the chosen specialty area by completing the course requirements and passing a national certification examination.

·  Effectively use information technology to support teaching/coaching/counseling strategies in advanced practice roles with diverse global communities as measured by completion of clinical courses, research, evidence-based masters project and other course requirements.

·  Implement an advanced practice role which incorporates the values of holistic caring and cultural competence by completing the program requirements and advanced practice national certification.

·  Interpret the impact of global, historical, political, legal, bioethical, economic and organizational factors on healthcare/educational environment through completion of course requirements and practicum experiences.

·  Use conceptual frameworks to guide the implementation and evaluation of advanced practice through completion of a masters project and completion of course assignments.