Sasha Poucki

Adjunct Professor, Political Science Department

Geography and World Issues, Fall 2006


Course Description:
This course is focused on exploring topics that form the discipline of political geography, with its linkages to contemporary world issues, political actions, environmental issues, economic relationships, ethnic and national disputes, etc. This course focuses on the intersection of geography and current issues that shape the modern world. This course is intended to provide students with introductory knowledge of Political Geography and a discussion of major issues, events and themes that shape today’s world. The aim of this course is to generate interest and provide students with working knowledge of Political Geography and World Issues, as well as to build students’ abilities for critical thinking.

Required Text:
Political Geography, 3rd Edition (2004) Martin Glassner and Chuck Fahrer (John Wiley & Sons, Inc.) ISBN: 0-471-35266-7

World Civilization 1, Fall 2006
Course Description:
This course is intended to provide students with a survey of World Humanities history, focusing on major events and themes in political, economic, social, and cultural history from prehistory to the 1500s. The aim of this course is to generate interest and provide students with working knowledge of history and World art and humanities, as well as to build students’ abilities for critical thinking.

Required Text:
Western Civilization, 6th Edition (2006) Jackson J. Spielvogel (Thomson-Wadsworth) ISBN: 0-534-6460206

Evaluation:
Class Participation (10%) • Attendance and participation in the group discussions are a vital part of this course.
Class Presentation (20%) • Every student will be required to have a small presentation with topics related to the class and of their own interest. Example: Global Warming, Globalization, Human Rights, Open borders etc.
Mid-term Exam (30%) • The type of questions will range from multiple choice, short essays and true/false answers.
Final Exam (40%) • The type of questions will range from multiple choice, short essays and true/false answers.

Late assignment policy
Work that is handed in late with a documented legitimate excuse will be accepted without penalty. Examples of documented legitimate excuses include a doctor’s note or emergency room receipt if the absence was due to illness, an official document from your workplace proving that your job sent you out of town for extensive period of time. Other work that is handed in late, without a documented legitimate excuse, will lose one-grade increment per class session that it is late. For example, an assignment that would have received an A, if handed in on time, will receive a B if handed in one week late. The maximum penalty is two full letter grades: assignments handed in two or more weeks late will lose two letter grades.
Important Note! In the case of Plagiarism during the exam if there is evidence that a student has collaborated with others or has presented others’ words or sequences of ideas as his or her own, the case will be reported to the Disciplinary/Honor Committee. No credit will be given unless the case is resolved with a finding of “Not Guilty.” By “evidence” I mean something in writing that clearly shows proof of plagiarism or illegitimate collaboration.
Why you should not plagiarize? If you plagiarize, you are cheating yourself. Plagiarism is dishonest because it misrepresents the work of another as your own. Plagiarism violates FDU student code and can result in Failure of the class, Suspension or Dismissal. Submitting a professional writer's work as yours is taking an unfair advantage over students who do their own work.

Links of interest:

East European Studies, The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
ReliefWeb is the global hub for time-critical humanitarian information on Complex Emergencies and Natural Disasters
TravelPod is a service which lets you share your travels using your own online travelogue ( also known as a travel journal or travel blog ).


Short Abstract