Philosophy


[NOTE: Change in Minor to 15 credits effective Fall 2016. Current students can elect to move to 15 credits minor as of Spring 2016. Consult with your advisor]

The 15-credit minor is dedicated to producing graduates who will embrace “the examined life,” learning to ask probing questions regarding critical aspects of human existence.  Graduates acquire skills in critical thinking and moral reasoning, as well as knowledge of world philosophies and religions. Students also become aware of how ideas, including both secular and religious commitments and values, continue to shape our world as they encounter fundamental questions asked by every generation of humans in cultures across the globe.  The minor prepares the student both for lives as global citizens and for excellence in a variety of professional settings, including (but not limited to) law, business, education, and the non-profit sector.

The following lists the requirements for the Philosophy minor:

1.       Two philosophy electives (any two courses PHIL 1000 or higher)

2.       One Law, Logic, and Critical Thinking class (from any of the below):

CRIM1101: Introduction to Critical Thinking
CRIM1103: Criminal Law
CRIM1112: Minorities, Women, and the Criminal Justice System
CRIM1120: Introduction to Jurisprudence
CRIM2214: Criminal Procedure Law
CRIM2216: Sex, Deviance, and the Law
CRIM2250: Emerging Issues in Crime and Justice
CRIM3321: Drugs, Addiction, and the Law
CRIM3890: Legal and Analytical Reasoning
PHIL1101: Introduction to Logic
PHIL2000: Logical Thinking
PHIL3302: Symbolic Logic
POLS2205: Comparative Legal Systems
POLS2212: International Law
POLS3355: American Constitutional Law I
POLS3356: American Constitutional Law II
PSYC3317: Psychology and the Law

3.       One Applied Ethical Thinking class (from any of the below)

BIO4405: Ethics in Science
COMM4443: Ethics in Media
CRIM3304: Criminal Justice Ethics
HIST2601: Ethical Debates in History
NURS3209   : Bioethics
PHIL1103: Ethics
PHIL3300: Business Ethics
PHIL3310: Human Perspectives in a Computerized Society
PHIL3311: Ethics of Food
PHIL/HUMN4438: Ethics and Public Affairs
POLS2606: Ethics and Politics
RELI3323: Ethics of Jesus
HUMN/PHIL3307 Slavery and Global Ethics 

4.       One Comparative Philosophy and Religion class (from any of the below):

HUMN2254/PHIL2254: War and Peace in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam
HUMN2446: Religion and Human Rights
HUMN/PHIL2448: Comparative Religion
HUMN3315: Jerusalem in Jerusalem
HUMN/RELI3316: Babylon the Great
HUMN/RELI3317: Ancient Egypt
PHIL/RELI1105: World Religions in America
PHIL2105: Current Moral and Social Issues
PHIL/HUMN2440: Human Rights
PHIL2256: Fundamentalism in Religious Practice
PHIL2321: African Philosophy
PHIL2439: Radical Political Thought
PHIL2452: Ancient Political Thought
PHIL4310: Modern Political Thought
POLS3011: Human Rights in a Global Perspective
RELI2107: One God, Three Paths
RELI2255: Person/Gender/Sexuality: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
RELI2273: The Battle Over the Book
RELI3324: Islamic Religion-Past and Present
RELI3334: Religion and Politics
SOCI3340: Gender Roles Across Cultures
SOCI3342: Sexual Diversity
SOCI3343: Communication and Culture
SOCI3402: Religion, Identity, and World Society