Undergraduate Programs


The School of Psychology offers a four-year B.A. in Psychology with optional career tracks in mental health, clinical social work, forensic psychology, consumer psychology and organizational behavior/human resources. The school also offers five-year accelerated B.A./M.A. programs in general/theoretical psychology and forensic psychology and a combined B.A. in Psychology (clinical social work track) and Master's in Social Work (in conjunction with New York University's School of Social Work). All programs offer a wide range of courses at both introductory and advanced levels in areas such as developmental, social, abnormal, personality, and experimental psychology, and in special topic areas such as techniques of psychotherapy, drugs and behavior, health psychology, sport psychology, psychology and the law, and current issues in psychology.

The mental health and clinical social work tracks provide specialized course work and practical experience that will make one more attractive to employers (e.g., mental health services, child care, casework) immediately after graduation. These tracks also provide a competitive edge when seeking admission to applied graduate programs (e.g., clinical & school psychology; social work).  The course work gives an in-depth analysis of psychopathology and permits a greater understanding of the various therapeutic approaches. At the same time, students receive “hands-on” experience at a practicum site of their choice to help facilitate the integration of theory and practice.

The forensic psychology track affords students an introduction to the dynamic fields of criminal justice and forensic psychology, integration of forensic science disciplines with criminal investigations, and training in psychological theory, research methods, and the application of psychological principles to specific areas of the legal system. At the same time, students enrolled in this track may receive "hands-on" experience at a practicum site of their choice to help facilitate the integration of theory and practice, and will come away with an interdisciplinary background appropriate for careers in psychology, social work, law enforcement, or other criminal justice professions.

The consumer psychology and organizational behavior/human resources(OB/HR) tracks are ideal for students who want an applied business-oriented focus to their training, but do not want to be business majors. Students in these tracks will take the required core psychology courses along with courses from the management (OB/HR track) or marketing (consumer psychology track) departments. The consumer psychology track will provide students with an understanding of human responses to product- and service-related information and experiences. This track will prepare students to work in private industry, non-profit, and government agencies in positions related to marketing research, advertising, designing/evaluating community-wide interventions, public health campaigns, social marketing, etc. The OB/HR track will provide students with a background in organizational processes and decision-making related to personnel selection, training and management. This track will prepare students to work in private industry, non-profit, and government agencies in positions related to human resources and/or management consulting.

The accelerated B.A./M.A. programs in general/theoretical and forensic psychology combine the undergraduate B.A. in Psychology and graduate (M.A.) degrees in these areas. These programs allow students to complete a bachelor's and a master's degree in just five years. The savings in time and tuition are accomplished through a process of cross-crediting 15 undergraduate and graduate credits. Within the undergraduate portion of the program, it is possible to complete one of the specialized undergraduate tracks described above, without incurring additional undergraduate credits. The combined B.A. in Psychology (clinical social work track) and Master's in Social Work (in conjunction with New York University's School of Social Work) also allows students to complete the typical B.A./M.A. course sequence in five years, rather than the usual six years of full-time study.