Spring 2015 Courses

COMM 1001 31    COMMUNICATION IN EVERYDAY LIFE

TF                        3:35-4:50pm                    Haspel

This course will provide students with a foundation in communication concepts, theory, and research, while helping them begin to master practical communication skills, such as listening and critical thinking, using technology to communicate, understanding nonverbal communication, creating persuasive strategies, and managing group conflict. Topics will include self-development, interpersonal communication, family communication, group communication, public speaking, media/technology, communicating in the workplace, and in public. Note: This is a freshmen-only course; sophomores may only take this course with special permission from the Department Chair

COMM 2001 31    PERSPECTIVES ON COMMUNICATION STUDIES

MTH                    12:45-2:00pm                  Caldiero

What is communication? This is the question that drives this course. The structure of the course reflects the fact that there are two main schools in the study of communication. The first sees communication as the transmission of messages. It is concerned with how senders and receivers encode and decode and sees communication as a process by which one person affects the behavior or the state of mind of another. The second school sees communication as the production and exchange of meanings. It is concerned with how people interact with messages/texts/language in order to produce meaning and examines the roles of texts/language in our culture. Prerequisite: ENGW1102 Research Writing Workshop

COMM 2002 31    SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION

TF                        11:20-12:35pm                Radford

Using a variety of research methods, communication scholars, sociologists, psychologists, and anthropologists have reached a similar conclusion about humankind: we are social creatures. The main purpose of this course is to help you become a better communicator in the context of a small group. The objective is to give you both a broad understanding of group communication processes and practical advice to help you become a more effective small group participant. The course will primarily deal with task-oriented small groups – groups with a specific objective to achieve, information to share, a problem to solve, or a decision to make. Prerequisite: COMM 2001

COMM 2004 31    PUBLIC RELATIONS PRINCIPLES

MTH                    11:20-12:35                     Weiner

This course explores the field of professional public relations including its origin and trends affecting the future of practice. Additionally, the course will cover topics such as effective writing skills, campaign development and ethical and legal implications of the profession.

COMM 2099        PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATIONS      

MTH  31               2 :10-3 :25pm                  Dinerstein

TF      32               12 :45-2 :00pm                Golgolab

TF      33               2 :10-3 :25pm                  Muska

W       61              6:00-8:35pm                    Dinerstein  

Professional Communications is an advanced writing and oral communication course, which emphasizes the importance of collaborative communication techniques used in the workplace. The course features an extended simulation that integrates work-related written and oral communication through practical application. The simulation allows students to gain experience similar to that of the workplace. The course also concentrates on business writing – including letters, memos, reports, proposals – oral presentations, listening skills, and group dynamics. Prerequisite: ENGW 1102 Research Writing Workshop

COMM 2866 31    WOMEN & MINORITIES IN THE MEDIA

W                         11:20-1:50pm                  Latson

With an emphasis on print and broadcast journalism, this course will examine the history, role and impact of women and minorities in American media, as well as contemporary issues of race, ethnicity and sex and how they are reported.

COMM 3005 31    SOCIAL MEDIA, COMMUNICATION & COMMUNITY

MTH                    12:45-2:00pm                  Spina

With the advent of virtual communities, online social networks, and the rapidly advancing use of social media, the question of effective communications can be addressed through multiple lenses. Drawing upon the theoretical literature from various disciplines, this course will enable students to understand what constitutes social media and its associated technology; and, its impact on communications within groups, organizations, and society in general. Students will be expected to actively engage in several forms of social media. In addition, students will be introduced to the concept and practice of social network analysis and its role in measuring communications flows within organizations and groups. Prerequisite: COMM2001 Perspectives on Communication Studies

COMM 3016 31    NEWS EDITING

MTH                    11:20-12:35pm                Latson

Practical instruction in editing copy and writing headlines for newspapers. Also covers standard news style, newsroom routine, newsroom technology, wire services, photo editing, typography, page makeup and design and ethical and legal limitations on the press. Prerequisite: ENGW 1102 Research Writing Workshop

COMM 3018        MASS COMMUNICATION

TF 31                    11:20-12:35pm                STAFF

TF 32                    12:45-2:00pm                  STAFF

This broad-based survey course will look at the development of, and contemporary trends in, all of the major mass media industries including: books, newspapers, magazines, sound recordings, motion pictures, radio, television, and the WWW. Time will also be spent discussing media effects and other cultural issues related to our use of mass communication media. Prerequisite: COMM2001 Perspectives on Communication Studies

COMM 3022 31    COMMUNICATION RESEARCH

MTH                    2:10-3:35pm                    Caldiero

The primary goals/objectives for this course are to introduce students to the concepts, approaches, and tools for gathering and analyzing information in research related to communication, and generally, to make students better consumers of the research they are exposed to in their everyday lives. By the end of the semester students will be acquainted with the terminology and concepts of social science research as they are used in the field of communication studies, be able to use library and Internet sources to gather information, be able to develop a research question, hypothesis, and accompanying review of the relevant literature, and have a working understanding of the range of methodological approaches available to communication researchers. Prerequisite: COMM2001 Perspectives on Communication Studies

COMM 3023 61    FILM AND CULTURE

TH                        6:00-8:35                         Weiner

A course in the way fil reflects and influences culture. Focus on a historical or cultural theme represented in film; background reading in appropriate cultural texts and documents. Topics vary from semester to semester, such as politics and community in American film; American individualism and the Western; the crime film and American values; America and the psychology of war. Film screenings held in addition to class time. Prerequisite: ENGW 1102 Research Writing Workshop

COMM 3035 31    PUBLIC RELATIONS WRITING

TF                        9:55-11:10am                  Fenichel

This course will introduce students to the field of public relations and provide them with a good repertoire of writing skills and techniques for use in public relations. It will discuss both the theory and practice of public relations with particular emphasis on writing for the media, for crisis communication and for advertising and publicity. Prerequisite: COMM2004 Public Relations

COMM 3051 31    COMMUNICATION AND GENDER

MTH                    9:55-11:10am                  Hersh

Starting with a more general exploration of gender and communication, and moving into media, education and workplace-specific applications, this course seeks to blend extensive reading and personal reflection into a solid understanding of what “gender” means in today’s society and the implications that this understanding has for communication in our personal and professional lives.

COMM 3060 31    TELEVISION NEWS

TH                        2:10-4:40pm                    Siegelin

This course will address all of the key areas that go into the creation, production and distribution of television news. Time will be spent exploring how television news is researched, written, and produced and how all of the elements come together to form the final polished (and sometimes not so polished) broadcasts that we see each and every day. The course will consider the differences between network and cable news broadcasts, between local and 24 hour news, and between morning and evening network news broadcasts. Time will also be spent examining the ethical, racial and gender issues that come up when making decisions regarding television news. Through this course students will gain valuable experience writing copy for television news and laying out the elements of a 30-minute news broadcast while also exploring the inner workings and politics of a career in television news. Prerequisite: COMM 2001

COMM 3243 31    ADVANCED ADVERTISING & PROMOTIONS

MTH                    9:55-11:10am                  Weiner

The goal of this course is to further expand on the knowledge and skills developed in COMM 2221: Advertising Principles through the completion of advanced written and creative projects. Since this is an advanced course, it will be assumed that you have basic knowledge of the advertising business and the media outlets that are available to today’s advertisers. A second goal of the course is to explore the theoretical and pragmatic aspects of account management. We will focus on the basic principles of account planning, good account management, and the relationships that exist within agencies and between agencies, clients and consumers. Finally, we will delve further into the area of media buying. Some time will also be spent discussing planning and budgeting for advertising campaigns, but the bulk of our time will be spent on creating more sophisticated advertising and promotional campaigns and polishing the communication skills that are such a vital part of account management. Prerequisite: COMM2221 Advertising Principles

COMM 3248 31    WRITING FOR BROADCAST AND PODCAST

T                          2:10-4:40pm                    Dinerstein

This course will prepare students to write for the electronic news media. In addition to developing the skills necessary for writing good radio and television news copy and promotional/commercial copy, students will also discuss current issues (ethics, legal issues and history) as well as current events in broadcast journalism. Writing projects will be completed both individually and in teams and sample assignments may include radio and television commercials, broadcast news copy, broadcast interviews, public service announcements, and dramatic pieces.

COMM 3341 61    RADIO MANAGEMENT

M                          6:00-8:35pm                    McDermott

This course provides insight into the management principles and practices of the modern and quickly evolving broadcasting industry including traditional AM/FM broadcasts, but also digital streaming, podcasting and media related blogging. The course will include training and practice in radio announcing as well as other tools, techniques, and applications for successful modern audio productions. Students will also receive an introduction to radio programming, production, broadcast station policies, legal issues, and industry trends. Our class will very actively participate in the ongoing programming, management and development of the campus radio station. Students will be expected to be very hands-on at the station and to develop a basic competency at audio editing.

COMM 3349 31    INTRODUCTION TO TELEVISION

W                         2:10-4:40pm                    Siegelin

This introductory course will examine the language and narrative structure of television and cover such practical areas as videography, cinematography, and editing. Time will also be spent reviewing the history of television and addressing special topics such as music television, animation, commercials, and reality programming. Prerequisite: COMM2001 Perspectives on Communication Studies

COMM 3432 61    SPORTS JOURNALISM

W                         6:00-8:35pm                    Caldiero

This course provides practical training for students interested in a career in sports journalism, from the basics of game coverage to interviews, profiles, columns, investigative stories, analysis, and commentaries. Students will work toward an understanding of how to report and write about such topics as the business of sports and gender and racial issues in sports. Students will cover events and practice writing on deadline, study the differences in reporting for print, online and broadcast, and learn how to inject interpretation and color into their coverage without losing professionalism. Prerequisite: ENGW 1101 Research Writing Workshop

COMM 4001 31D COMMUNICATION INTERNSHIP I*

WEB                                                           Lehr

A minimum of 150 hours of work in a communications-related position, e.g. public relations, advertising, journalism, broadcasting, corporate communications, etc. Final grade is based on the student's Discussion board participation, two written evaluations from his or her supervisor, and a final evaluation paper and work-related portfolio. Required of all Communication Studies majors. Prerequisite: COMM2001. *This is a fully on-line course.

COMM 4002 31D COMMUNICATION INTERNSHIP II*

WEB                                                           Lehr

For students who wish to complete a second for-credit internship. A minimum of 150 hours of work in a communication-related position, e.g. public relations, advertising, journalism, broadcasting, corporate communications, etc. Final grade is based on the student's Discussion board participation, two written evaluations from his or her supervisor, and a final paper and work-related portfolio. Prerequisite: COMM4001. *This is a fully on-line course.

COMM 4005 31    LITERARY & COMMUNICATION THEORY

TF                        9:55-11:10am                  Radford

This course considers the contribution and impact of literary theory within contemporary communication studies. The course examines perspectives such as semiotics, phenomenology, ethnomethodology, structuralism, and post-structuralism, and explores what literary and narrative theory contributes to our understanding of human communication processes. Prerequisite: COMM2001. NOTE: This course is open to Seniors only.

COMM 4444 31    MULTIMEDIA JOURNALISM

MTH                    12:45-2:00pm                  Latson

This course is an effort to keep up with the ever-changing media landscape. In addition to developing the skills needed to ensure they produce solid journalism, students will learn how to apply multimedia techniques to tell stories in new and interesting ways. Throughout the semester, students will work on developing their own Web pages, complete with original reporting, audio and video components, photography and blogs. Students will also study current events, as well as ethical and legal issues in electronic media. Prerequisite: Students should have taken at least one Journalism course prior to enrolling in this course.

 

This page last updated October 17, 2014 by Gary P. Radford.